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A Clinical Comparison of Pycnogenol, Antistax, and Stocking in Chronic Venous Insufficiency.
Int J Angiol. 2015 Dec; 24(4):268-74.IJ

Abstract

This 8-week registry study was a comparative evaluation of Pycnogenol (French Maritime Pine Bark extract; Horphag Research, Geneva) and Antistax (grape leaf extract [GLE, Boehringer Ingelheim, Germany]) in controlling symptoms of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). "Standard management" for CVI is compression; a group of comparable subjects was monitored to evaluate the effects of stockings. The registry included 183 patients (166 completing). Supplementation with Antistax (two tablets of 360 mg/d) or Pycnogenol (100 mg/d) was used. The groups were comparable for age, symptoms, venous incompetence, and microcirculation (with increased capillary filtration and skin flux) at inclusion. At 8 weeks, the rate of swelling (p < 0.05) and skin flux decreased toward normal values; changes were more important with Pycnogenol (p < 0.05). Transcutaneous Po 2 was increased more with Pycnogenol (p < 0.05). Ankle circumference was decreased more (p < 0.05) with Pycnogenol. An analog scale quantified symptoms. At 8 weeks, pain and edema were decreased with Pycnogenol and elastic compression (p < 0.05) with prevalence for Pycnogenol (p < 0.05). Edema with Pycnogenol was decreased by 40%. Induration was reduced only in the Pycnogenol group (p < 0.05) with minimal variations in the other groups. Tolerability and compliance were optimal. Elastic compression was correctly used by 80% of the patients indicating that it may be more difficult to use, particularly in warmer days. Costs for Pycnogenol were lower (96; 3.3 Euros) in comparison with the other groups (132;1.4 Euros for GLE and 149; 2.2 Euros for compression).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Irvine3 Labs, Biomedical Sciences, Chieti-Pescara University, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26648668

Citation

Belcaro, Gianni. "A Clinical Comparison of Pycnogenol, Antistax, and Stocking in Chronic Venous Insufficiency." The International Journal of Angiology : Official Publication of the International College of Angiology, Inc, vol. 24, no. 4, 2015, pp. 268-74.
Belcaro G. A Clinical Comparison of Pycnogenol, Antistax, and Stocking in Chronic Venous Insufficiency. Int J Angiol. 2015;24(4):268-74.
Belcaro, G. (2015). A Clinical Comparison of Pycnogenol, Antistax, and Stocking in Chronic Venous Insufficiency. The International Journal of Angiology : Official Publication of the International College of Angiology, Inc, 24(4), 268-74. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0035-1556060
Belcaro G. A Clinical Comparison of Pycnogenol, Antistax, and Stocking in Chronic Venous Insufficiency. Int J Angiol. 2015;24(4):268-74. PubMed PMID: 26648668.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A Clinical Comparison of Pycnogenol, Antistax, and Stocking in Chronic Venous Insufficiency. A1 - Belcaro,Gianni, Y1 - 2015/07/15/ PY - 2015/12/10/entrez PY - 2015/12/10/pubmed PY - 2015/12/10/medline KW - Antistax KW - Pycnogenol KW - Stockings KW - edema KW - supplements KW - venous insufficiency SP - 268 EP - 74 JF - The International journal of angiology : official publication of the International College of Angiology, Inc JO - Int J Angiol VL - 24 IS - 4 N2 - This 8-week registry study was a comparative evaluation of Pycnogenol (French Maritime Pine Bark extract; Horphag Research, Geneva) and Antistax (grape leaf extract [GLE, Boehringer Ingelheim, Germany]) in controlling symptoms of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). "Standard management" for CVI is compression; a group of comparable subjects was monitored to evaluate the effects of stockings. The registry included 183 patients (166 completing). Supplementation with Antistax (two tablets of 360 mg/d) or Pycnogenol (100 mg/d) was used. The groups were comparable for age, symptoms, venous incompetence, and microcirculation (with increased capillary filtration and skin flux) at inclusion. At 8 weeks, the rate of swelling (p < 0.05) and skin flux decreased toward normal values; changes were more important with Pycnogenol (p < 0.05). Transcutaneous Po 2 was increased more with Pycnogenol (p < 0.05). Ankle circumference was decreased more (p < 0.05) with Pycnogenol. An analog scale quantified symptoms. At 8 weeks, pain and edema were decreased with Pycnogenol and elastic compression (p < 0.05) with prevalence for Pycnogenol (p < 0.05). Edema with Pycnogenol was decreased by 40%. Induration was reduced only in the Pycnogenol group (p < 0.05) with minimal variations in the other groups. Tolerability and compliance were optimal. Elastic compression was correctly used by 80% of the patients indicating that it may be more difficult to use, particularly in warmer days. Costs for Pycnogenol were lower (96; 3.3 Euros) in comparison with the other groups (132;1.4 Euros for GLE and 149; 2.2 Euros for compression). SN - 1061-1711 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26648668/full_citation L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0035-1556060 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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