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Cancer statistics, 2016.

Abstract

Each year, the American Cancer Society estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths that will occur in the United States in the current year and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival. Incidence data were collected by the National Cancer Institute (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results [SEER] Program), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (National Program of Cancer Registries), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Mortality data were collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. In 2016, 1,685,210 new cancer cases and 595,690 cancer deaths are projected to occur in the United States. Overall cancer incidence trends (13 oldest SEER registries) are stable in women, but declining by 3.1% per year in men (from 2009-2012), much of which is because of recent rapid declines in prostate cancer diagnoses. The cancer death rate has dropped by 23% since 1991, translating to more than 1.7 million deaths averted through 2012. Despite this progress, death rates are increasing for cancers of the liver, pancreas, and uterine corpus, and cancer is now the leading cause of death in 21 states, primarily due to exceptionally large reductions in death from heart disease. Among children and adolescents (aged birth-19 years), brain cancer has surpassed leukemia as the leading cause of cancer death because of the dramatic therapeutic advances against leukemia. Accelerating progress against cancer requires both increased national investment in cancer research and the application of existing cancer control knowledge across all segments of the population.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Director, Surveillance Information, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

    ,

    Epidemiologist, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

    Vice President, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

    Source

    MeSH

    American Cancer Society
    Continental Population Groups
    Female
    Humans
    Incidence
    Male
    Neoplasms
    Registries
    SEER Program
    Sex Distribution
    Survival Rate
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26742998

    Citation

    Siegel, Rebecca L., et al. "Cancer Statistics, 2016." CA: a Cancer Journal for Clinicians, vol. 66, no. 1, 2016, pp. 7-30.
    Siegel RL, Miller KD, Jemal A. Cancer statistics, 2016. CA Cancer J Clin. 2016;66(1):7-30.
    Siegel, R. L., Miller, K. D., & Jemal, A. (2016). Cancer statistics, 2016. CA: a Cancer Journal for Clinicians, 66(1), pp. 7-30. doi:10.3322/caac.21332.
    Siegel RL, Miller KD, Jemal A. Cancer Statistics, 2016. CA Cancer J Clin. 2016;66(1):7-30. PubMed PMID: 26742998.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Cancer statistics, 2016. AU - Siegel,Rebecca L, AU - Miller,Kimberly D, AU - Jemal,Ahmedin, Y1 - 2016/01/07/ PY - 2015/10/15/received PY - 2015/10/15/accepted PY - 2016/1/9/entrez PY - 2016/1/9/pubmed PY - 2016/5/26/medline KW - cancer cases KW - cancer statistics KW - death rates KW - incidence KW - mortality KW - survival KW - trends SP - 7 EP - 30 JF - CA: a cancer journal for clinicians JO - CA Cancer J Clin VL - 66 IS - 1 N2 - Each year, the American Cancer Society estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths that will occur in the United States in the current year and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival. Incidence data were collected by the National Cancer Institute (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results [SEER] Program), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (National Program of Cancer Registries), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Mortality data were collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. In 2016, 1,685,210 new cancer cases and 595,690 cancer deaths are projected to occur in the United States. Overall cancer incidence trends (13 oldest SEER registries) are stable in women, but declining by 3.1% per year in men (from 2009-2012), much of which is because of recent rapid declines in prostate cancer diagnoses. The cancer death rate has dropped by 23% since 1991, translating to more than 1.7 million deaths averted through 2012. Despite this progress, death rates are increasing for cancers of the liver, pancreas, and uterine corpus, and cancer is now the leading cause of death in 21 states, primarily due to exceptionally large reductions in death from heart disease. Among children and adolescents (aged birth-19 years), brain cancer has surpassed leukemia as the leading cause of cancer death because of the dramatic therapeutic advances against leukemia. Accelerating progress against cancer requires both increased national investment in cancer research and the application of existing cancer control knowledge across all segments of the population. SN - 1542-4863 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26742998/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.3322/caac.21332 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -