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Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer.

Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    Department of Medical Oncology, Institute of Oncology, Istanbul University , Capa, Istanbul, Turkey.

    Source

    Oncology reviews 9:1 2015 Feb 10 pg 288

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26779313

    Citation

    Aykan, Nuri Faruk. "Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer." Oncology Reviews, vol. 9, no. 1, 2015, p. 288.
    Aykan NF. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer. Oncol Rev. 2015;9(1):288.
    Aykan, N. F. (2015). Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer. Oncology Reviews, 9(1), p. 288. doi:10.4081/oncol.2015.288.
    Aykan NF. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer. Oncol Rev. 2015 Feb 10;9(1):288. PubMed PMID: 26779313.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer. A1 - Aykan,Nuri Faruk, Y1 - 2015/12/28/ PY - 2015/08/15/received PY - 2015/11/26/revised PY - 2015/12/17/accepted PY - 2016/1/19/entrez PY - 2016/1/19/pubmed PY - 2016/1/19/medline KW - Red meat KW - colon cancer KW - colorectal cancer KW - processed meat KW - rectal cancer SP - 288 EP - 288 JF - Oncology reviews JO - Oncol Rev VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented. SN - 1970-5565 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26779313/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.4081/oncol.2015.288 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -