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Heme Iron Intake, Dietary Antioxidant Capacity, and Risk of Colorectal Adenomas in a Large Cohort Study of French Women.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Nitrosylated and non-nitrosylated heme iron from red processed and nonprocessed meat have been associated with increased colorectal carcinogenesis. Mechanisms include oxidative processes. It has been hypothesized that dietary antioxidants could counteract the effects of heme iron. We investigated the relationships between heme iron intake and the risk of colorectal adenomas, and a potential interaction with the dietary antioxidant capacity, in the E3N prospective cohort study.

METHODS

The study included 17,397 women, who underwent at least one colonoscopy. Among them, 1,409 were diagnosed with at least one first colorectal adenoma during the 103,253 person-years of follow-up. Dietary intake was measured by a semiquantitative food history questionnaire. HR estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained from Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for potential confounders.

RESULTS

Heme iron intake was positively associated with colorectal and colon adenoma risks [HR for the fourth vs. first quartile: HR4 = 1.36 (1.13-1.65), Ptrend = 0.001 and HR4 = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.19-1.87; Ptrend = 0.0003, respectively]. Nonnitrosylated and nitrosylated heme iron intakes were, respectively, associated with advanced distal and proximal adenoma risks. There was a dose-effect relationship between the heme iron to total dietary antioxidant capacity ratio and colorectal adenoma risk.

CONCLUSION

In this prospective cohort study, the association between heme iron and colorectal adenoma risk was found to depend on site, nitrosylation or not, and the ratio with the NEAC.

IMPACT

These results emphasize the need for a global assessment of diet when considering nutritional prevention of colorectal carcinogenesis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(4); 640-7. ©2016 AACR.

Authors+Show Affiliations

CESP, INSERM, Univ Paris-Sud, UVSQ, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif Cedex, F-94805, France. Gustave Roussy, F-94805, Villejuif Cedex, France.CESP, INSERM, Univ Paris-Sud, UVSQ, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif Cedex, F-94805, France. Gustave Roussy, F-94805, Villejuif Cedex, France.CESP, INSERM, Univ Paris-Sud, UVSQ, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif Cedex, F-94805, France. Gustave Roussy, F-94805, Villejuif Cedex, France.CESP, INSERM, Univ Paris-Sud, UVSQ, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif Cedex, F-94805, France. Gustave Roussy, F-94805, Villejuif Cedex, France.Functional Food and Metabolic Stress Prevention Laboratory, CRA-NUT, Rome, Italy.CESP, INSERM, Univ Paris-Sud, UVSQ, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif Cedex, F-94805, France. Gustave Roussy, F-94805, Villejuif Cedex, France.CESP, INSERM, Univ Paris-Sud, UVSQ, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif Cedex, F-94805, France. Gustave Roussy, F-94805, Villejuif Cedex, France.TOXALIM, Team 9, INRA UMR 1331, ENVT, INP, UPS, Toulouse, France.CESP, INSERM, Univ Paris-Sud, UVSQ, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif Cedex, F-94805, France. Gustave Roussy, F-94805, Villejuif Cedex, France.CESP, INSERM, Univ Paris-Sud, UVSQ, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif Cedex, F-94805, France. Gustave Roussy, F-94805, Villejuif Cedex, France. marie-christine.boutron@gustaveroussy.fr.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26823477

Citation

Bastide, Nadia, et al. "Heme Iron Intake, Dietary Antioxidant Capacity, and Risk of Colorectal Adenomas in a Large Cohort Study of French Women." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 25, no. 4, 2016, pp. 640-7.
Bastide N, Morois S, Cadeau C, et al. Heme Iron Intake, Dietary Antioxidant Capacity, and Risk of Colorectal Adenomas in a Large Cohort Study of French Women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2016;25(4):640-7.
Bastide, N., Morois, S., Cadeau, C., Kangas, S., Serafini, M., Gusto, G., ... Boutron-Ruault, M. C. (2016). Heme Iron Intake, Dietary Antioxidant Capacity, and Risk of Colorectal Adenomas in a Large Cohort Study of French Women. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 25(4), pp. 640-7. doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-0724.
Bastide N, et al. Heme Iron Intake, Dietary Antioxidant Capacity, and Risk of Colorectal Adenomas in a Large Cohort Study of French Women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2016;25(4):640-7. PubMed PMID: 26823477.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Heme Iron Intake, Dietary Antioxidant Capacity, and Risk of Colorectal Adenomas in a Large Cohort Study of French Women. AU - Bastide,Nadia, AU - Morois,Sophie, AU - Cadeau,Claire, AU - Kangas,Suvi, AU - Serafini,Mauro, AU - Gusto,Gaëlle, AU - Dossus,Laure, AU - Pierre,Fabrice H, AU - Clavel-Chapelon,Françoise, AU - Boutron-Ruault,Marie-Christine, Y1 - 2016/01/28/ PY - 2015/07/17/received PY - 2016/01/09/accepted PY - 2016/1/30/entrez PY - 2016/1/30/pubmed PY - 2017/2/1/medline SP - 640 EP - 7 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 25 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Nitrosylated and non-nitrosylated heme iron from red processed and nonprocessed meat have been associated with increased colorectal carcinogenesis. Mechanisms include oxidative processes. It has been hypothesized that dietary antioxidants could counteract the effects of heme iron. We investigated the relationships between heme iron intake and the risk of colorectal adenomas, and a potential interaction with the dietary antioxidant capacity, in the E3N prospective cohort study. METHODS: The study included 17,397 women, who underwent at least one colonoscopy. Among them, 1,409 were diagnosed with at least one first colorectal adenoma during the 103,253 person-years of follow-up. Dietary intake was measured by a semiquantitative food history questionnaire. HR estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained from Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Heme iron intake was positively associated with colorectal and colon adenoma risks [HR for the fourth vs. first quartile: HR4 = 1.36 (1.13-1.65), Ptrend = 0.001 and HR4 = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.19-1.87; Ptrend = 0.0003, respectively]. Nonnitrosylated and nitrosylated heme iron intakes were, respectively, associated with advanced distal and proximal adenoma risks. There was a dose-effect relationship between the heme iron to total dietary antioxidant capacity ratio and colorectal adenoma risk. CONCLUSION: In this prospective cohort study, the association between heme iron and colorectal adenoma risk was found to depend on site, nitrosylation or not, and the ratio with the NEAC. IMPACT: These results emphasize the need for a global assessment of diet when considering nutritional prevention of colorectal carcinogenesis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(4); 640-7. ©2016 AACR. SN - 1538-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26823477/full_citation L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=26823477 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -