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High-Fat and Low-Carbohydrate Diets Are Associated with Allergic Rhinitis But Not Asthma or Atopic Dermatitis in Children.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Numerous studies have suggested that nutritional intake is related to allergic diseases. Although conflicting results exist, fat intake is often associated with allergic diseases. We investigated the relationship between allergic diseases and nutritional intake after adjusting for various demographic and socioeconomic factors in a large, representative sample of Korean children.

METHODS

A total of 3,040 participants, aged 4 to 13 years old, were enrolled in the present study from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), 2010-2012. Nutritional intake data, including total calories, protein, fat, carbohydrate, vitamin A, vitamin C, thiamine, riboflavin, and niacin, were retrieved from the survey using the complete 24-hour recall method. The associations between each nutritional factor and allergic rhinitis/asthma/atopic dermatitis were analyzed using simple and multiple logistic regression analyses with complex sampling. Age, sex, body mass index (BMI), number of household members, income level, and region of residence were adjusted for as covariates.

RESULTS

Of the participants, 22.1%, 6.0%, and 15.5% suffered from allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis, respectively. Allergic rhinitis was significantly correlated with high-fat and low-carbohydrate diets. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) was 1.25 (95% CIs = 1.06-1.46, P = 0.007) for fat intake, denoting a 10% increase. Carbohydrate intake (10% increase) was negatively related to allergic rhinitis with an AOR of 0.84 (95% CIs = 0.74-0.95, P = 0.004). No other significant relationships were found between the retrieved nutritional factors and either asthma or atopic dermatitis.

CONCLUSION

Allergic rhinitis was related to high-fat and low-carbohydrate diets. Although the underlying mechanisms and causal relationships remain elusive, the present study provides reliable evidence regarding the associations between nutritional factors and allergic rhinitis by considering numerous factors within a large and representative population.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea. Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seoul, Korea.

    ,

    Department of Statistics, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea.

    ,

    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Korea.

    ,

    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

    Department of Statistics, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea.

    Source

    PloS one 11:2 2016 pg e0150202

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Asthma
    Body Mass Index
    Causality
    Child
    Child, Preschool
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Dermatitis, Atopic
    Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted
    Diet, High-Fat
    Dietary Proteins
    Energy Intake
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Nutritive Value
    Republic of Korea
    Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial
    Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal
    Socioeconomic Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26919190

    Citation

    Kim, So Young, et al. "High-Fat and Low-Carbohydrate Diets Are Associated With Allergic Rhinitis but Not Asthma or Atopic Dermatitis in Children." PloS One, vol. 11, no. 2, 2016, pp. e0150202.
    Kim SY, Sim S, Park B, et al. High-Fat and Low-Carbohydrate Diets Are Associated with Allergic Rhinitis But Not Asthma or Atopic Dermatitis in Children. PLoS ONE. 2016;11(2):e0150202.
    Kim, S. Y., Sim, S., Park, B., Kim, J. H., & Choi, H. G. (2016). High-Fat and Low-Carbohydrate Diets Are Associated with Allergic Rhinitis But Not Asthma or Atopic Dermatitis in Children. PloS One, 11(2), pp. e0150202. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0150202.
    Kim SY, et al. High-Fat and Low-Carbohydrate Diets Are Associated With Allergic Rhinitis but Not Asthma or Atopic Dermatitis in Children. PLoS ONE. 2016;11(2):e0150202. PubMed PMID: 26919190.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - High-Fat and Low-Carbohydrate Diets Are Associated with Allergic Rhinitis But Not Asthma or Atopic Dermatitis in Children. AU - Kim,So Young, AU - Sim,Songyong, AU - Park,Bumjung, AU - Kim,Jin-Hwan, AU - Choi,Hyo Geun, Y1 - 2016/02/26/ PY - 2015/08/27/received PY - 2016/02/10/accepted PY - 2016/2/27/entrez PY - 2016/2/27/pubmed PY - 2016/7/28/medline SP - e0150202 EP - e0150202 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 11 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have suggested that nutritional intake is related to allergic diseases. Although conflicting results exist, fat intake is often associated with allergic diseases. We investigated the relationship between allergic diseases and nutritional intake after adjusting for various demographic and socioeconomic factors in a large, representative sample of Korean children. METHODS: A total of 3,040 participants, aged 4 to 13 years old, were enrolled in the present study from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), 2010-2012. Nutritional intake data, including total calories, protein, fat, carbohydrate, vitamin A, vitamin C, thiamine, riboflavin, and niacin, were retrieved from the survey using the complete 24-hour recall method. The associations between each nutritional factor and allergic rhinitis/asthma/atopic dermatitis were analyzed using simple and multiple logistic regression analyses with complex sampling. Age, sex, body mass index (BMI), number of household members, income level, and region of residence were adjusted for as covariates. RESULTS: Of the participants, 22.1%, 6.0%, and 15.5% suffered from allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis, respectively. Allergic rhinitis was significantly correlated with high-fat and low-carbohydrate diets. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) was 1.25 (95% CIs = 1.06-1.46, P = 0.007) for fat intake, denoting a 10% increase. Carbohydrate intake (10% increase) was negatively related to allergic rhinitis with an AOR of 0.84 (95% CIs = 0.74-0.95, P = 0.004). No other significant relationships were found between the retrieved nutritional factors and either asthma or atopic dermatitis. CONCLUSION: Allergic rhinitis was related to high-fat and low-carbohydrate diets. Although the underlying mechanisms and causal relationships remain elusive, the present study provides reliable evidence regarding the associations between nutritional factors and allergic rhinitis by considering numerous factors within a large and representative population. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26919190/full_citation L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0150202 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -