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Food of animal origin and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma: A review of the literature and meta-analysis.
Crit Rev Oncol Hematol 2016; 100:16-24CR

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Several studies investigated whether the consumption of foods of animal origin affects the risk of haematological malignancies, with conflicting results. To help clarify this issue, we performed a meta-analysis of observational studies published until November 2014 that investigated the association between the consumption of foods of animal origin (red, processed and white meat, fish and seafood, dairy products and eggs) and the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and its major subtypes and multiple myeloma among adults.

METHODS

We calculated summary relative risks (SRR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) by using random effect models with maximum likelihood estimation.

RESULTS

Overall, 16,525 non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 3665 multiple myeloma cases from thirty-three independent studies were included. We found an association between consumption of red meat and the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (SRR 1.22, 95% CI 1.03-1.44, I(2)=35%). The consumption of fish and seafood was inversely associated with the risk of multiple myeloma (SRR 0.71, 95% CI 0.51-1.00, I(2)=82%), although the between-studies heterogeneity was high. Finally, the consumption of dairy products was positively associated, with borderline significance, with the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (SRR 1.26, 95% CI 0.99-1.60, I(2)=49%).

CONCLUSIONS

Foods of animal origin likely play a role in the aetiology of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma, with red meat and dairy tending to increase the risk, and fish that tends to decrease it. Our findings reinforce the recommendations to reduce the consumption of red meat by replacing it with vegetables, legumes and fish.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unit of Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention, Florence, Italy. Electronic address: s.caini@ispo.toscana.it.Unit of Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention, Florence, Italy. Electronic address: g.masala@ispo.toscana.it.Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: patrizia.gnagnarella@ieo.it.Unit of Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention, Florence, Italy. Electronic address: i.ermini@ispo.toscana.it.Library, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: william.russell-edu@ieo.it.Unit of Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention, Florence, Italy. Electronic address: d.palli@ispo.toscana.it.Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: sara.gandini@ieo.it.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26921971

Citation

Caini, Saverio, et al. "Food of Animal Origin and Risk of non-Hodgkin Lymphoma and Multiple Myeloma: a Review of the Literature and Meta-analysis." Critical Reviews in Oncology/hematology, vol. 100, 2016, pp. 16-24.
Caini S, Masala G, Gnagnarella P, et al. Food of animal origin and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma: A review of the literature and meta-analysis. Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 2016;100:16-24.
Caini, S., Masala, G., Gnagnarella, P., Ermini, I., Russell-Edu, W., Palli, D., & Gandini, S. (2016). Food of animal origin and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma: A review of the literature and meta-analysis. Critical Reviews in Oncology/hematology, 100, pp. 16-24. doi:10.1016/j.critrevonc.2016.02.011.
Caini S, et al. Food of Animal Origin and Risk of non-Hodgkin Lymphoma and Multiple Myeloma: a Review of the Literature and Meta-analysis. Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 2016;100:16-24. PubMed PMID: 26921971.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Food of animal origin and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma: A review of the literature and meta-analysis. AU - Caini,Saverio, AU - Masala,Giovanna, AU - Gnagnarella,Patrizia, AU - Ermini,Ilaria, AU - Russell-Edu,William, AU - Palli,Domenico, AU - Gandini,Sara, Y1 - 2016/02/18/ PY - 2015/09/04/received PY - 2016/01/07/revised PY - 2016/02/15/accepted PY - 2016/2/29/entrez PY - 2016/2/29/pubmed PY - 2016/11/8/medline KW - Foods of animal origin KW - Meta-analysis KW - Myeloma KW - Non-Hodgkin lymphoma SP - 16 EP - 24 JF - Critical reviews in oncology/hematology JO - Crit. Rev. Oncol. Hematol. VL - 100 N2 - BACKGROUND: Several studies investigated whether the consumption of foods of animal origin affects the risk of haematological malignancies, with conflicting results. To help clarify this issue, we performed a meta-analysis of observational studies published until November 2014 that investigated the association between the consumption of foods of animal origin (red, processed and white meat, fish and seafood, dairy products and eggs) and the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and its major subtypes and multiple myeloma among adults. METHODS: We calculated summary relative risks (SRR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) by using random effect models with maximum likelihood estimation. RESULTS: Overall, 16,525 non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 3665 multiple myeloma cases from thirty-three independent studies were included. We found an association between consumption of red meat and the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (SRR 1.22, 95% CI 1.03-1.44, I(2)=35%). The consumption of fish and seafood was inversely associated with the risk of multiple myeloma (SRR 0.71, 95% CI 0.51-1.00, I(2)=82%), although the between-studies heterogeneity was high. Finally, the consumption of dairy products was positively associated, with borderline significance, with the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (SRR 1.26, 95% CI 0.99-1.60, I(2)=49%). CONCLUSIONS: Foods of animal origin likely play a role in the aetiology of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma, with red meat and dairy tending to increase the risk, and fish that tends to decrease it. Our findings reinforce the recommendations to reduce the consumption of red meat by replacing it with vegetables, legumes and fish. SN - 1879-0461 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26921971/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1040-8428(16)30035-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -