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Probiotics for Prevention of Atopy and Food Hypersensitivity in Early Childhood: A PRISMA-Compliant Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Abstract

Most studies investigated probiotics on food hypersensitivity, not on oral food challenge confirmed food allergy in children. The authors systematically reviewed the literature to investigate whether probiotic supplementation prenatally and/or postnatally could reduce the risk of atopy and food hypersensitivity in young children.PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and 4 main Chinese literature databases (Wan Fang, VIP, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and SinoMed) were searched for randomized controlled trials regarding the effect of probiotics on the prevention of allergy in children. The last search was conducted on July 11, 2015.Seventeen trials involving 2947 infants were included. The first follow-up studies were analyzed. Pooled analysis indicated that probiotics administered prenatally and postnatally could reduce the risk of atopy (relative risk [RR] 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.92; I = 0%), especially when administered prenatally to pregnant mother and postnatally to child (RR 0.71; 95% CI 0.57-0.89; I = 0%), and the risk of food hypersensitivity (RR 0.77; 95% CI 0.61-0.98; I = 0%). When probiotics were administered either only prenatally or only postnatally, no effects of probiotics on atopy and food hypersensitivity were observed.Probiotics administered prenatally and postnatally appears to be a feasible way to prevent atopy and food hypersensitivity in young children. The long-term effects of probiotics, however, remain to be defined in the follow-up of existing trials. Still, studies on probiotics and confirmed food allergy, rather than surrogate measure of food hypersensitivity, are warranted.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    From the Department of Gastroenterology (G-QZ, H-JH, QZ, SS, Z-YL) and Department of Nephrology (C-YL), Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders, Chongqing International Science and Technology Cooperation Center for Child Development and Disorders, Key Laboratory of Pediatrics in Chongqing, Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.

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    Source

    Medicine 95:8 2016 Feb pg e2562

    MeSH

    Child
    Child, Preschool
    Female
    Food Hypersensitivity
    Humans
    Hypersensitivity
    Infant
    Pregnancy
    Probiotics
    Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review
    Systematic Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26937896

    Citation

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang, et al. "Probiotics for Prevention of Atopy and Food Hypersensitivity in Early Childhood: a PRISMA-Compliant Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials." Medicine, vol. 95, no. 8, 2016, pp. e2562.
    Zhang GQ, Hu HJ, Liu CY, et al. Probiotics for Prevention of Atopy and Food Hypersensitivity in Early Childhood: A PRISMA-Compliant Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Medicine (Baltimore). 2016;95(8):e2562.
    Zhang, G. Q., Hu, H. J., Liu, C. Y., Zhang, Q., Shakya, S., & Li, Z. Y. (2016). Probiotics for Prevention of Atopy and Food Hypersensitivity in Early Childhood: A PRISMA-Compliant Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Medicine, 95(8), pp. e2562. doi:10.1097/MD.0000000000002562.
    Zhang GQ, et al. Probiotics for Prevention of Atopy and Food Hypersensitivity in Early Childhood: a PRISMA-Compliant Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Medicine (Baltimore). 2016;95(8):e2562. PubMed PMID: 26937896.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Probiotics for Prevention of Atopy and Food Hypersensitivity in Early Childhood: A PRISMA-Compliant Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. AU - Zhang,Guo-Qiang, AU - Hu,Hua-Jian, AU - Liu,Chuan-Yang, AU - Zhang,Qiao, AU - Shakya,Shristi, AU - Li,Zhong-Yue, PY - 2016/3/4/entrez PY - 2016/3/5/pubmed PY - 2016/7/22/medline SP - e2562 EP - e2562 JF - Medicine JO - Medicine (Baltimore) VL - 95 IS - 8 N2 - Most studies investigated probiotics on food hypersensitivity, not on oral food challenge confirmed food allergy in children. The authors systematically reviewed the literature to investigate whether probiotic supplementation prenatally and/or postnatally could reduce the risk of atopy and food hypersensitivity in young children.PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and 4 main Chinese literature databases (Wan Fang, VIP, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and SinoMed) were searched for randomized controlled trials regarding the effect of probiotics on the prevention of allergy in children. The last search was conducted on July 11, 2015.Seventeen trials involving 2947 infants were included. The first follow-up studies were analyzed. Pooled analysis indicated that probiotics administered prenatally and postnatally could reduce the risk of atopy (relative risk [RR] 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.92; I = 0%), especially when administered prenatally to pregnant mother and postnatally to child (RR 0.71; 95% CI 0.57-0.89; I = 0%), and the risk of food hypersensitivity (RR 0.77; 95% CI 0.61-0.98; I = 0%). When probiotics were administered either only prenatally or only postnatally, no effects of probiotics on atopy and food hypersensitivity were observed.Probiotics administered prenatally and postnatally appears to be a feasible way to prevent atopy and food hypersensitivity in young children. The long-term effects of probiotics, however, remain to be defined in the follow-up of existing trials. Still, studies on probiotics and confirmed food allergy, rather than surrogate measure of food hypersensitivity, are warranted. SN - 1536-5964 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26937896/full_citation L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=26937896 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -