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Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention.
Nutrients 2016; 8(3):163N

Abstract

Nutritional supplements are widely used among patients with cancer who perceive them to be anticancer and antitoxicity agents. Depending on the type of malignancy and the gender 30%-90% of the cancer patients supplement their diets with antioxidant and immuno-stabilizing micronutrients, such as selenium, vitamin C, and vitamin D, often without the knowledge of the treating physician. From the oncological viewpoint, there are justifiable concerns that dietary supplements decrease the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent studies, however, have provided increasing evidence that treatment is tolerated better-with an increase in patient compliance and a lower rate of treatment discontinuations-when micronutrients, such as selenium, are added as appropriate to the patient's medication. Nutritional supplementation tailored to an individual's background diet, genetics, tumor histology, and treatments may yield benefits in subsets of patients. Clinicians should have an open dialogue with patients about nutritional supplements. Supplement advice needs to be individualized and come from a credible source, and it is best communicated by the physician.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Akademie für Mikronährstoffmedizin, Essen, Zweigertstrasse 55, 45130 Essen, Germany. uwegroeber@gmx.net.Akademie für Mikronährstoffmedizin, Essen, Zweigertstrasse 55, 45130 Essen, Germany. p.holzhauer@ioz-muenchen.de. Interdisziplinäres onkologisches Zentrum (IOZ), München, Nuβbaumstrasse 12, München 80336, Germany. p.holzhauer@ioz-muenchen.de. Klinik Bad Trissl, Innere Medizin II-Onkologie und Komplementärmedizin, Oberaudorf 83080, Germany. p.holzhauer@ioz-muenchen.de.Akademie für Mikronährstoffmedizin, Essen, Zweigertstrasse 55, 45130 Essen, Germany. klaus.kisters@annahospital.de. St. Anna Hospital, Medizinische Klinik I, Herne, Hospitalstrasse 19, Herne 44649, Germany. klaus.kisters@annahospital.de.Boston University Medical Center, 85 East Newton Street M-1033, Boston, MA 02118, USA. mfholick@bu.edu.Klinik für Strahlentherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Ruhr Universität Bochum (RUB), Hölkeskampring 40, Herne 44625, Germany. irenaeus.adamietz@elisabethgruppe.de.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26985904

Citation

Gröber, Uwe, et al. "Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention." Nutrients, vol. 8, no. 3, 2016, p. 163.
Gröber U, Holzhauer P, Kisters K, et al. Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention. Nutrients. 2016;8(3):163.
Gröber, U., Holzhauer, P., Kisters, K., Holick, M. F., & Adamietz, I. A. (2016). Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention. Nutrients, 8(3), p. 163. doi:10.3390/nu8030163.
Gröber U, et al. Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention. Nutrients. 2016 Mar 12;8(3):163. PubMed PMID: 26985904.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention. AU - Gröber,Uwe, AU - Holzhauer,Peter, AU - Kisters,Klaus, AU - Holick,Michael F, AU - Adamietz,Irenäus A, Y1 - 2016/03/12/ PY - 2015/11/23/received PY - 2016/02/16/revised PY - 2016/02/24/accepted PY - 2016/3/18/entrez PY - 2016/3/18/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline KW - ">l-carnitine KW - Micronutrients KW - antioxidants KW - cancer KW - chemotherapy KW - radiotherapy KW - selenium KW - treatment related side effects KW - vitamin C KW - vitamin D SP - 163 EP - 163 JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 8 IS - 3 N2 - Nutritional supplements are widely used among patients with cancer who perceive them to be anticancer and antitoxicity agents. Depending on the type of malignancy and the gender 30%-90% of the cancer patients supplement their diets with antioxidant and immuno-stabilizing micronutrients, such as selenium, vitamin C, and vitamin D, often without the knowledge of the treating physician. From the oncological viewpoint, there are justifiable concerns that dietary supplements decrease the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent studies, however, have provided increasing evidence that treatment is tolerated better-with an increase in patient compliance and a lower rate of treatment discontinuations-when micronutrients, such as selenium, are added as appropriate to the patient's medication. Nutritional supplementation tailored to an individual's background diet, genetics, tumor histology, and treatments may yield benefits in subsets of patients. Clinicians should have an open dialogue with patients about nutritional supplements. Supplement advice needs to be individualized and come from a credible source, and it is best communicated by the physician. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26985904/full_citation L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu8030163 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -