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Genetic and Dietary Factors Influencing the Progression of Nuclear Cataract.

Abstract

PURPOSE

To determine the heritability of nuclear cataract progression and to explore prospectively the effect of dietary micronutrients on the progression of nuclear cataract.

DESIGN

Prospective cohort study.

PARTICIPANTS

Cross-sectional nuclear cataract and dietary measurements were available for 2054 white female twins from the TwinsUK cohort. Follow-up cataract measurements were available for 324 of the twins (151 monozygotic and 173 dizygotic twins).

METHODS

Nuclear cataract was measured using a quantitative measure of nuclear density obtained from digital Scheimpflug images. Dietary data were available from EPIC food frequency questionnaires. Heritability was modeled using maximum likelihood structural equation twin modeling. Association between nuclear cataract change and micronutrients was investigated using linear and multinomial regression analysis. The mean interval between baseline and follow-up examination was 9.4 years.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Nuclear cataract progression.

RESULTS

The best-fitting model estimated that the heritability of nuclear cataract progression was 35% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13-54), and individual environmental factors explained the remaining 65% (95% CI, 46-87) of variance. Dietary vitamin C was protective against both nuclear cataract at baseline and nuclear cataract progression (β = -0.0002, P = 0.01 and β = -0.001, P = 0.03, respectively), whereas manganese and intake of micronutrient supplements were protective against nuclear cataract at baseline only (β = -0.009, P = 0.03 and β = -0.03, P = 0.01, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

Genetic factors explained 35% of the variation in progression of nuclear cataract over a 10-year period. Environmental factors accounted for the remaining variance, and in particular, dietary vitamin C protected against cataract progression assessed approximately 10 years after baseline.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, Kings College London, London, United Kingdom.

    ,

    Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, Kings College London, London, United Kingdom; University of Warwick Medical School, Coventry, United Kingdom.

    ,

    Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, Kings College London, London, United Kingdom.

    ,

    Department of Ophthalmology, Kings College London, London, United Kingdom.

    ,

    Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, Kings College London, London, United Kingdom.

    ,

    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.

    Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, Kings College London, London, United Kingdom; Department of Ophthalmology, Kings College London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: chris.hammond@kcl.ac.uk.

    Source

    Ophthalmology 123:6 2016 06 pg 1237-44

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Cataract
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Diet
    Diet Surveys
    Disease Progression
    Diseases in Twins
    European Continental Ancestry Group
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    Genetic Predisposition to Disease
    Humans
    Middle Aged
    Prospective Studies
    Quantitative Trait, Heritable
    Twins, Dizygotic
    Twins, Monozygotic

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Twin Study
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    27016950

    Citation

    Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina, et al. "Genetic and Dietary Factors Influencing the Progression of Nuclear Cataract." Ophthalmology, vol. 123, no. 6, 2016, pp. 1237-44.
    Yonova-Doing E, Forkin ZA, Hysi PG, et al. Genetic and Dietary Factors Influencing the Progression of Nuclear Cataract. Ophthalmology. 2016;123(6):1237-44.
    Yonova-Doing, E., Forkin, Z. A., Hysi, P. G., Williams, K. M., Spector, T. D., Gilbert, C. E., & Hammond, C. J. (2016). Genetic and Dietary Factors Influencing the Progression of Nuclear Cataract. Ophthalmology, 123(6), pp. 1237-44. doi:10.1016/j.ophtha.2016.01.036.
    Yonova-Doing E, et al. Genetic and Dietary Factors Influencing the Progression of Nuclear Cataract. Ophthalmology. 2016;123(6):1237-44. PubMed PMID: 27016950.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Genetic and Dietary Factors Influencing the Progression of Nuclear Cataract. AU - Yonova-Doing,Ekaterina, AU - Forkin,Zoe A, AU - Hysi,Pirro G, AU - Williams,Katie M, AU - Spector,Tim D, AU - Gilbert,Clare E, AU - Hammond,Christopher J, Y1 - 2016/03/23/ PY - 2015/09/29/received PY - 2016/01/13/revised PY - 2016/01/24/accepted PY - 2016/3/28/entrez PY - 2016/3/28/pubmed PY - 2017/6/27/medline SP - 1237 EP - 44 JF - Ophthalmology JO - Ophthalmology VL - 123 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE: To determine the heritability of nuclear cataract progression and to explore prospectively the effect of dietary micronutrients on the progression of nuclear cataract. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: Cross-sectional nuclear cataract and dietary measurements were available for 2054 white female twins from the TwinsUK cohort. Follow-up cataract measurements were available for 324 of the twins (151 monozygotic and 173 dizygotic twins). METHODS: Nuclear cataract was measured using a quantitative measure of nuclear density obtained from digital Scheimpflug images. Dietary data were available from EPIC food frequency questionnaires. Heritability was modeled using maximum likelihood structural equation twin modeling. Association between nuclear cataract change and micronutrients was investigated using linear and multinomial regression analysis. The mean interval between baseline and follow-up examination was 9.4 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Nuclear cataract progression. RESULTS: The best-fitting model estimated that the heritability of nuclear cataract progression was 35% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13-54), and individual environmental factors explained the remaining 65% (95% CI, 46-87) of variance. Dietary vitamin C was protective against both nuclear cataract at baseline and nuclear cataract progression (β = -0.0002, P = 0.01 and β = -0.001, P = 0.03, respectively), whereas manganese and intake of micronutrient supplements were protective against nuclear cataract at baseline only (β = -0.009, P = 0.03 and β = -0.03, P = 0.01, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Genetic factors explained 35% of the variation in progression of nuclear cataract over a 10-year period. Environmental factors accounted for the remaining variance, and in particular, dietary vitamin C protected against cataract progression assessed approximately 10 years after baseline. SN - 1549-4713 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27016950/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0161-6420(16)00114-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -