Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Diet, Microbiota, Obesity, and NAFLD: A Dangerous Quartet.

Abstract

Recently, the importance of the gut-liver-adipose tissue axis has become evident. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic disease of a systemic metabolic disorder that radiates from energy-surplus induced adiposopathy. The gut microbiota has tremendous influences in our whole-body metabolism, and is crucial for our well-being and health. Microorganisms precede humans in more than 400 million years and our guest flora evolved with us in order to help us face aggressor microorganisms, to help us maximize the energy that can be extracted from nutrients, and to produce essential nutrients/vitamins that we are not equipped to produce. However, our gut microbiota can be disturbed, dysbiota, and become itself a source of stress and injury. Dysbiota may adversely impact metabolism and immune responses favoring obesity and obesity-related disorders such as insulin resistance/diabetes mellitus and NAFLD. In this review, we will summarize the latest evidence of the role of microbiota/dysbiota in diet-induced obesity and NAFLD, as well as the potential therapeutic role of targeting the microbiota in this set.

Links

  • PMC Free PDF
  • PMC Free Full Text
  • FREE Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Departamento de Gastrenterologia, Hospital de Santa Maria, Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Norte (CHLN), 1649-035 Lisbon, Portugal. mverdelhomachado@gmail.com. Laboratório de Nutrição, Faculdade de Medicina de Lisboa, Universidade de Lisboa, Alameda da Universidade, 1649-004 Lisboa, Portugal. mverdelhomachado@gmail.com.

    Departamento de Gastrenterologia, Hospital de Santa Maria, Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Norte (CHLN), 1649-035 Lisbon, Portugal. hlcortezpinto@netcabo.pt. Laboratório de Nutrição, Faculdade de Medicina de Lisboa, Universidade de Lisboa, Alameda da Universidade, 1649-004 Lisboa, Portugal. hlcortezpinto@netcabo.pt.

    Source

    MeSH

    Animals
    Diet
    Humans
    Intestines
    Microbiota
    Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
    Obesity
    Probiotics

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    27043550

    Citation

    Machado, Mariana Verdelho, and Helena Cortez-Pinto. "Diet, Microbiota, Obesity, and NAFLD: a Dangerous Quartet." International Journal of Molecular Sciences, vol. 17, no. 4, 2016, p. 481.
    Machado MV, Cortez-Pinto H. Diet, Microbiota, Obesity, and NAFLD: A Dangerous Quartet. Int J Mol Sci. 2016;17(4):481.
    Machado, M. V., & Cortez-Pinto, H. (2016). Diet, Microbiota, Obesity, and NAFLD: A Dangerous Quartet. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 17(4), p. 481. doi:10.3390/ijms17040481.
    Machado MV, Cortez-Pinto H. Diet, Microbiota, Obesity, and NAFLD: a Dangerous Quartet. Int J Mol Sci. 2016 Apr 1;17(4):481. PubMed PMID: 27043550.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Diet, Microbiota, Obesity, and NAFLD: A Dangerous Quartet. AU - Machado,Mariana Verdelho, AU - Cortez-Pinto,Helena, Y1 - 2016/04/01/ PY - 2016/02/29/received PY - 2016/03/21/revised PY - 2016/03/28/accepted PY - 2016/4/5/entrez PY - 2016/4/5/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline KW - diet KW - dysbiota KW - microbiota KW - nonalcoholic fatty liver disease KW - obesity KW - probiotics SP - 481 EP - 481 JF - International journal of molecular sciences JO - Int J Mol Sci VL - 17 IS - 4 N2 - Recently, the importance of the gut-liver-adipose tissue axis has become evident. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic disease of a systemic metabolic disorder that radiates from energy-surplus induced adiposopathy. The gut microbiota has tremendous influences in our whole-body metabolism, and is crucial for our well-being and health. Microorganisms precede humans in more than 400 million years and our guest flora evolved with us in order to help us face aggressor microorganisms, to help us maximize the energy that can be extracted from nutrients, and to produce essential nutrients/vitamins that we are not equipped to produce. However, our gut microbiota can be disturbed, dysbiota, and become itself a source of stress and injury. Dysbiota may adversely impact metabolism and immune responses favoring obesity and obesity-related disorders such as insulin resistance/diabetes mellitus and NAFLD. In this review, we will summarize the latest evidence of the role of microbiota/dysbiota in diet-induced obesity and NAFLD, as well as the potential therapeutic role of targeting the microbiota in this set. SN - 1422-0067 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27043550/full_citation L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=ijms17040481 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -