Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Prenatal Nicotine Exposure and Risk of Schizophrenia Among Offspring in a National Birth Cohort.
Am J Psychiatry 2016; 173(8):799-806AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Cigarette smoking during pregnancy is a major public health problem leading to adverse health outcomes and neurodevelopmental abnormalities among offspring. Its prevalence in the United States and Europe is 12%-25%. This study examined the relationship between prenatal nicotine exposure (cotinine level) in archived maternal sera and schizophrenia in offspring from a national birth cohort.

METHOD

The authors conducted a population-based nested case-control study of all live births in Finland from 1983 to 1998. Cases of schizophrenia in offspring (N=977) were identified from a national registry and matched 1:1 to controls on date of birth, sex, and residence. Maternal serum cotinine levels were prospectively measured, using quantitative immunoassay, from early- to mid-gestation serum specimens archived in a national biobank.

RESULTS

A higher maternal cotinine level, measured as a continuous variable, was associated with an increased odds of schizophrenia (odds ratio=3.41, 95% confidence interval, 1.86-6.24). Categorically defined heavy maternal nicotine exposure was related to a 38% increased odds of schizophrenia. These findings were not accounted for by maternal age, maternal or parental psychiatric disorders, socioeconomic status, and other covariates. There was no clear evidence that weight for gestational age mediated the associations.

CONCLUSIONS

To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study of the relationship between a maternal smoking biomarker and schizophrenia. It provides the most definitive evidence to date that smoking during pregnancy is associated with schizophrenia. If replicated, these findings suggest that preventing smoking during pregnancy may decrease the incidence of schizophrenia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland, and the Department of Psychiatry, Lapland Hospital District, Rovaniemi, Finland; the Department of Child Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Turku, and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; the National Institute for Health and Welfare, Oulu, Finland; the Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, and New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York; and the Departments of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York.From the Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland, and the Department of Psychiatry, Lapland Hospital District, Rovaniemi, Finland; the Department of Child Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Turku, and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; the National Institute for Health and Welfare, Oulu, Finland; the Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, and New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York; and the Departments of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York.From the Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland, and the Department of Psychiatry, Lapland Hospital District, Rovaniemi, Finland; the Department of Child Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Turku, and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; the National Institute for Health and Welfare, Oulu, Finland; the Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, and New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York; and the Departments of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York.From the Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland, and the Department of Psychiatry, Lapland Hospital District, Rovaniemi, Finland; the Department of Child Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Turku, and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; the National Institute for Health and Welfare, Oulu, Finland; the Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, and New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York; and the Departments of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York.From the Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland, and the Department of Psychiatry, Lapland Hospital District, Rovaniemi, Finland; the Department of Child Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Turku, and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; the National Institute for Health and Welfare, Oulu, Finland; the Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, and New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York; and the Departments of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York.From the Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland, and the Department of Psychiatry, Lapland Hospital District, Rovaniemi, Finland; the Department of Child Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Turku, and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; the National Institute for Health and Welfare, Oulu, Finland; the Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, and New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York; and the Departments of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York.From the Research Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland, and the Department of Psychiatry, Lapland Hospital District, Rovaniemi, Finland; the Department of Child Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Turku, and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; the National Institute for Health and Welfare, Oulu, Finland; the Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, and New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York; and the Departments of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27216261

Citation

Niemelä, Solja, et al. "Prenatal Nicotine Exposure and Risk of Schizophrenia Among Offspring in a National Birth Cohort." The American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 173, no. 8, 2016, pp. 799-806.
Niemelä S, Sourander A, Surcel HM, et al. Prenatal Nicotine Exposure and Risk of Schizophrenia Among Offspring in a National Birth Cohort. Am J Psychiatry. 2016;173(8):799-806.
Niemelä, S., Sourander, A., Surcel, H. M., Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, S., McKeague, I. W., Cheslack-Postava, K., & Brown, A. S. (2016). Prenatal Nicotine Exposure and Risk of Schizophrenia Among Offspring in a National Birth Cohort. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 173(8), pp. 799-806. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.2016.15060800.
Niemelä S, et al. Prenatal Nicotine Exposure and Risk of Schizophrenia Among Offspring in a National Birth Cohort. Am J Psychiatry. 2016 08 1;173(8):799-806. PubMed PMID: 27216261.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal Nicotine Exposure and Risk of Schizophrenia Among Offspring in a National Birth Cohort. AU - Niemelä,Solja, AU - Sourander,Andre, AU - Surcel,Heljä-Marja, AU - Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki,Susanna, AU - McKeague,Ian W, AU - Cheslack-Postava,Keely, AU - Brown,Alan S, Y1 - 2016/05/24/ PY - 2016/5/25/entrez PY - 2016/5/25/pubmed PY - 2017/5/10/medline SP - 799 EP - 806 JF - The American journal of psychiatry JO - Am J Psychiatry VL - 173 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Cigarette smoking during pregnancy is a major public health problem leading to adverse health outcomes and neurodevelopmental abnormalities among offspring. Its prevalence in the United States and Europe is 12%-25%. This study examined the relationship between prenatal nicotine exposure (cotinine level) in archived maternal sera and schizophrenia in offspring from a national birth cohort. METHOD: The authors conducted a population-based nested case-control study of all live births in Finland from 1983 to 1998. Cases of schizophrenia in offspring (N=977) were identified from a national registry and matched 1:1 to controls on date of birth, sex, and residence. Maternal serum cotinine levels were prospectively measured, using quantitative immunoassay, from early- to mid-gestation serum specimens archived in a national biobank. RESULTS: A higher maternal cotinine level, measured as a continuous variable, was associated with an increased odds of schizophrenia (odds ratio=3.41, 95% confidence interval, 1.86-6.24). Categorically defined heavy maternal nicotine exposure was related to a 38% increased odds of schizophrenia. These findings were not accounted for by maternal age, maternal or parental psychiatric disorders, socioeconomic status, and other covariates. There was no clear evidence that weight for gestational age mediated the associations. CONCLUSIONS: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study of the relationship between a maternal smoking biomarker and schizophrenia. It provides the most definitive evidence to date that smoking during pregnancy is associated with schizophrenia. If replicated, these findings suggest that preventing smoking during pregnancy may decrease the incidence of schizophrenia. SN - 1535-7228 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27216261/full_citation L2 - https://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/full/10.1176/appi.ajp.2016.15060800?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -