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Association of sugar-sweetened beverage intake frequency and asthma among U.S. adults, 2013.
Prev Med 2016; 91:58-61PM

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake among U.S. adults is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. An association between SSB intake and asthma has been shown among U.S. children and Australian adults, but scant published information exists for U.S. adults. We examined associations between SSB intake and current asthma among U.S. adults, and the role of obesity in this association.

METHODS

We analyzed 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data for 146,990 adults (≥18years) from 23 states and the District of Columbia. We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate associations between current asthma and frequency (none, <1 time/day, once/day, ≥2 times/day) of SSB intake (soda, fruit drink, sweet tea, and sports/energy drink). SSB intake was measured using two questions. Covariates included age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, and smoking. Obesity, based on self-reported height and weight, was assessed as an effect modifier.

RESULTS

Overall, 9.1% of adults reported current asthma: 8.5% of adults who did not consume SSBs had current asthma vs 12.1% of adults who consumed SSBs ≥2 times/day. There was no difference in asthma prevalence with SSB intake <1 time/day (8.7%) or once/day (8.7%). Among non-obese adults, the odds of having current asthma were higher among those who consumed SSBs ≥2 times/day (aOR=1.66, 95%CI=1.39, 1.99) than non-SSB consumers. However, SSB intake frequency was not associated with asthma among obese adults.

CONCLUSIONS

Frequent SSB consumption was associated with asthma among non-obese adults. Research on asthma prevention should further consider the potential adverse effects of high SSB intake among U.S. adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: spark3@cdc.gov.Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, MD, USA.Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27496394

Citation

Park, Sohyun, et al. "Association of Sugar-sweetened Beverage Intake Frequency and Asthma Among U.S. Adults, 2013." Preventive Medicine, vol. 91, 2016, pp. 58-61.
Park S, Akinbami LJ, McGuire LC, et al. Association of sugar-sweetened beverage intake frequency and asthma among U.S. adults, 2013. Prev Med. 2016;91:58-61.
Park, S., Akinbami, L. J., McGuire, L. C., & Blanck, H. M. (2016). Association of sugar-sweetened beverage intake frequency and asthma among U.S. adults, 2013. Preventive Medicine, 91, pp. 58-61. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.08.004.
Park S, et al. Association of Sugar-sweetened Beverage Intake Frequency and Asthma Among U.S. Adults, 2013. Prev Med. 2016;91:58-61. PubMed PMID: 27496394.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of sugar-sweetened beverage intake frequency and asthma among U.S. adults, 2013. AU - Park,Sohyun, AU - Akinbami,Lara J, AU - McGuire,Lisa C, AU - Blanck,Heidi M, Y1 - 2016/08/02/ PY - 2016/03/15/received PY - 2016/06/20/revised PY - 2016/08/01/accepted PY - 2016/8/9/pubmed PY - 2017/11/29/medline PY - 2016/8/7/entrez KW - Adults KW - Asthma KW - BRFSS KW - Sugar-sweetened beverage SP - 58 EP - 61 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 91 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake among U.S. adults is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. An association between SSB intake and asthma has been shown among U.S. children and Australian adults, but scant published information exists for U.S. adults. We examined associations between SSB intake and current asthma among U.S. adults, and the role of obesity in this association. METHODS: We analyzed 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data for 146,990 adults (≥18years) from 23 states and the District of Columbia. We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate associations between current asthma and frequency (none, <1 time/day, once/day, ≥2 times/day) of SSB intake (soda, fruit drink, sweet tea, and sports/energy drink). SSB intake was measured using two questions. Covariates included age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, and smoking. Obesity, based on self-reported height and weight, was assessed as an effect modifier. RESULTS: Overall, 9.1% of adults reported current asthma: 8.5% of adults who did not consume SSBs had current asthma vs 12.1% of adults who consumed SSBs ≥2 times/day. There was no difference in asthma prevalence with SSB intake <1 time/day (8.7%) or once/day (8.7%). Among non-obese adults, the odds of having current asthma were higher among those who consumed SSBs ≥2 times/day (aOR=1.66, 95%CI=1.39, 1.99) than non-SSB consumers. However, SSB intake frequency was not associated with asthma among obese adults. CONCLUSIONS: Frequent SSB consumption was associated with asthma among non-obese adults. Research on asthma prevention should further consider the potential adverse effects of high SSB intake among U.S. adults. SN - 1096-0260 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27496394/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(16)30210-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -