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Poultry Consumption and Arsenic Exposure in the U.S. Population.
Environ Health Perspect. 2017 03; 125(3):370-377.EH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Arsenicals (roxarsone and nitarsone) used in poultry production likely increase inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), and roxarsone or nitarsone concentrations in poultry meat. However, the association between poultry intake and exposure to these arsenic species, as reflected in elevated urinary arsenic concentrations, is unknown.

OBJECTIVES

Our aim was to evaluate the association between 24-hr dietary recall of poultry consumption and arsenic exposure in the U.S. population. We hypothesized first, that poultry intake would be associated with higher urine arsenic concentrations and second, that the association between turkey intake and increased urine arsenic concentrations would be modified by season, reflecting seasonal use of nitarsone.

METHODS

We evaluated 3,329 participants ≥ 6 years old from the 2003-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) with urine arsenic available and undetectable urine arsenobetaine levels. Geometric mean ratios (GMR) of urine total arsenic and DMA were compared across increasing levels of poultry intake.

RESULTS

After adjustment, participants in the highest quartile of poultry consumption had urine total arsenic 1.12 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.22) and DMA 1.13 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.20) times higher than nonconsumers. During the fall/winter, participants in the highest quartile of turkey intake had urine total arsenic and DMA 1.17 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.39; p-trend = 0.02) and 1.13 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.30; p-trend = 0.03) times higher, respectively, than nonconsumers. Consumption of turkey during the past 24 hr was not associated with total arsenic or DMA during the spring/summer.

CONCLUSIONS

Poultry intake was associated with increased urine total arsenic and DMA in NHANES 2003-2010, reflecting arsenic exposure. Seasonally stratified analyses by poultry type provide strong suggestive evidence that the historical use of arsenic-based poultry drugs contributed to arsenic exposure in the U.S.

CITATION

Nigra AE, Nachman KE, Love DC, Grau-Perez M, Navas-Acien A. 2017. Poultry consumption and arsenic exposure in the U.S. Environ Health Perspect 125:370-377; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP351.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, New York, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27735790

Citation

Nigra, Anne E., et al. "Poultry Consumption and Arsenic Exposure in the U.S. Population." Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 125, no. 3, 2017, pp. 370-377.
Nigra AE, Nachman KE, Love DC, et al. Poultry Consumption and Arsenic Exposure in the U.S. Population. Environ Health Perspect. 2017;125(3):370-377.
Nigra, A. E., Nachman, K. E., Love, D. C., Grau-Perez, M., & Navas-Acien, A. (2017). Poultry Consumption and Arsenic Exposure in the U.S. Population. Environmental Health Perspectives, 125(3), 370-377. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP351
Nigra AE, et al. Poultry Consumption and Arsenic Exposure in the U.S. Population. Environ Health Perspect. 2017;125(3):370-377. PubMed PMID: 27735790.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Poultry Consumption and Arsenic Exposure in the U.S. Population. AU - Nigra,Anne E, AU - Nachman,Keeve E, AU - Love,David C, AU - Grau-Perez,Maria, AU - Navas-Acien,Ana, Y1 - 2016/10/13/ PY - 2016/04/12/received PY - 2016/08/24/revised PY - 2016/09/19/accepted PY - 2016/10/14/pubmed PY - 2017/9/25/medline PY - 2016/10/14/entrez SP - 370 EP - 377 JF - Environmental health perspectives JO - Environ Health Perspect VL - 125 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Arsenicals (roxarsone and nitarsone) used in poultry production likely increase inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), and roxarsone or nitarsone concentrations in poultry meat. However, the association between poultry intake and exposure to these arsenic species, as reflected in elevated urinary arsenic concentrations, is unknown. OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to evaluate the association between 24-hr dietary recall of poultry consumption and arsenic exposure in the U.S. population. We hypothesized first, that poultry intake would be associated with higher urine arsenic concentrations and second, that the association between turkey intake and increased urine arsenic concentrations would be modified by season, reflecting seasonal use of nitarsone. METHODS: We evaluated 3,329 participants ≥ 6 years old from the 2003-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) with urine arsenic available and undetectable urine arsenobetaine levels. Geometric mean ratios (GMR) of urine total arsenic and DMA were compared across increasing levels of poultry intake. RESULTS: After adjustment, participants in the highest quartile of poultry consumption had urine total arsenic 1.12 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.22) and DMA 1.13 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.20) times higher than nonconsumers. During the fall/winter, participants in the highest quartile of turkey intake had urine total arsenic and DMA 1.17 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.39; p-trend = 0.02) and 1.13 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.30; p-trend = 0.03) times higher, respectively, than nonconsumers. Consumption of turkey during the past 24 hr was not associated with total arsenic or DMA during the spring/summer. CONCLUSIONS: Poultry intake was associated with increased urine total arsenic and DMA in NHANES 2003-2010, reflecting arsenic exposure. Seasonally stratified analyses by poultry type provide strong suggestive evidence that the historical use of arsenic-based poultry drugs contributed to arsenic exposure in the U.S. CITATION: Nigra AE, Nachman KE, Love DC, Grau-Perez M, Navas-Acien A. 2017. Poultry consumption and arsenic exposure in the U.S. Environ Health Perspect 125:370-377; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP351. SN - 1552-9924 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27735790/full_citation L2 - https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/EHP351?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -