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Practical guidance for the management of iron deficiency in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
Therap Adv Gastroenterol. 2018; 11:1756284818769074.TA

Abstract

Iron deficiency or iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are some of the most common systemic complications of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Symptoms such as fatigue, reduced ability to concentrate and reduced exercise tolerance can mimic common symptoms of IBD and can therefore easily be overseen. Furthermore, clinicians tend to see mild to moderate anemia as an inevitable accompaniment of IBD that is sufficiently explained by the underlying disease and does not require further workup. But in contrast to these clinical routines, current guidelines recommend that any degree of anemia in patients with IBD should be further evaluated and treated. Multiple studies have shown that anemia is a main factor for decreased quality of life (QoL) in patients with IBD. Correction of anemia, however, can significantly improve the QoL of patients with IBD. It is therefore recommended that every patient with IBD is regularly screened for iron deficiency and anemia. If detected, appropriate workup and treatment should be initiated. Over the last years, a number of new diagnostic tools and treatment options have been developed. Multiple studies have demonstrated the safety of newer formulations of intravenous iron in patients with IBD and have compared oral and intravenous iron in various situations. Treatment recommendations have changed and new evidence-based guidelines were developed. However, to date these guidelines are still not widely implemented in clinical practice. The aim of this review is to draw attention to the need for treatment for every level of anemia in patients with IBD and to provide some practical guidance for screening, diagnostics, treatment and follow up of IDA in patients with IBD following current international guidelines.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine I (Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Infectious Diseases), University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.Department of Internal Medicine I (Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Infectious Diseases), University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.Department of Internal Medicine I (Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Infectious Diseases), University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.Department of Internal Medicine I, University Hospital Tübingen, Otfried-Müller-Str. 10, 72076 Tübingen, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29760784

Citation

Niepel, Dorothea, et al. "Practical Guidance for the Management of Iron Deficiency in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease." Therapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology, vol. 11, 2018, p. 1756284818769074.
Niepel D, Klag T, Malek NP, et al. Practical guidance for the management of iron deficiency in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Therap Adv Gastroenterol. 2018;11:1756284818769074.
Niepel, D., Klag, T., Malek, N. P., & Wehkamp, J. (2018). Practical guidance for the management of iron deficiency in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Therapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology, 11, 1756284818769074. https://doi.org/10.1177/1756284818769074
Niepel D, et al. Practical Guidance for the Management of Iron Deficiency in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Therap Adv Gastroenterol. 2018;11:1756284818769074. PubMed PMID: 29760784.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Practical guidance for the management of iron deficiency in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. AU - Niepel,Dorothea, AU - Klag,Thomas, AU - Malek,Nisar P, AU - Wehkamp,Jan, Y1 - 2018/04/26/ PY - 2017/11/05/received PY - 2018/03/11/accepted PY - 2018/5/16/entrez PY - 2018/5/16/pubmed PY - 2018/5/16/medline KW - Crohn’s disease KW - inflammatory bowel disease KW - iron deficiency KW - iron deficiency anemia KW - ulcerative colitis SP - 1756284818769074 EP - 1756284818769074 JF - Therapeutic advances in gastroenterology JO - Therap Adv Gastroenterol VL - 11 N2 - Iron deficiency or iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are some of the most common systemic complications of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Symptoms such as fatigue, reduced ability to concentrate and reduced exercise tolerance can mimic common symptoms of IBD and can therefore easily be overseen. Furthermore, clinicians tend to see mild to moderate anemia as an inevitable accompaniment of IBD that is sufficiently explained by the underlying disease and does not require further workup. But in contrast to these clinical routines, current guidelines recommend that any degree of anemia in patients with IBD should be further evaluated and treated. Multiple studies have shown that anemia is a main factor for decreased quality of life (QoL) in patients with IBD. Correction of anemia, however, can significantly improve the QoL of patients with IBD. It is therefore recommended that every patient with IBD is regularly screened for iron deficiency and anemia. If detected, appropriate workup and treatment should be initiated. Over the last years, a number of new diagnostic tools and treatment options have been developed. Multiple studies have demonstrated the safety of newer formulations of intravenous iron in patients with IBD and have compared oral and intravenous iron in various situations. Treatment recommendations have changed and new evidence-based guidelines were developed. However, to date these guidelines are still not widely implemented in clinical practice. The aim of this review is to draw attention to the need for treatment for every level of anemia in patients with IBD and to provide some practical guidance for screening, diagnostics, treatment and follow up of IDA in patients with IBD following current international guidelines. SN - 1756-283X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29760784/full_citation L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1756284818769074?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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