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Dietary factors and the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

Abstract

Dietary factors in the etiology of ovarian cancer were investigated with the use of data from a case-control study conducted in Northern Italy on 455 histologically confirmed epithelial carcinomas and 1,385 control subjects in the hospital for acute conditions unrelated to any of the known or potential risk factors for cancer of the ovary. Women with ovarian cancer reported significantly elevated frequency of consumption of meat [relative risk (RR) = 1.6 for greater than or equal to 7 vs. less than 4 portions/wk], ham (RR = 1.9 for greater than or equal to 4 vs. less than 2 portions/wk), and higher subjective scores of fat intake (RR = 2.1 for highest vs. lowest scores), particularly butter. In contrast, consumptions of fish, green vegetables, carrots, and wholemeal bread or pasta were less frequent in cases; the corresponding risk estimates for highest versus lowest frequencies ranged between 0.6 and 0.8. These results were not materially modified by adjustment for indicators of socioeconomic status, parity, and other identified determinants of ovarian cancer. No relation emerged between alcohol consumption and ovarian cancer risk. The present study provides interesting indications that help to explain the considerable variations in ovarian cancer rates in different populations and, if confirmed, could, in principle, have important public health implications. Due caution, however, is required in interpreting the present results because of the limitations of available information and of the uncertainties of other published material concerning diet and ovarian cancer.

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Authors+Show Affiliations

,

Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milano, Italy.

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Source

MeSH

Adult
Aged
Carcinoma
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Diet
Dietary Fats
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Italy
Meat Products
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms
Risk Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Vitamin A

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3116309

Citation

La Vecchia, C, et al. "Dietary Factors and the Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 79, no. 4, 1987, pp. 663-9.
La Vecchia C, Decarli A, Negri E, et al. Dietary factors and the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1987;79(4):663-9.
La Vecchia, C., Decarli, A., Negri, E., Parazzini, F., Gentile, A., Cecchetti, G., ... Franceschi, S. (1987). Dietary factors and the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 79(4), pp. 663-9.
La Vecchia C, et al. Dietary Factors and the Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1987;79(4):663-9. PubMed PMID: 3116309.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary factors and the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. AU - La Vecchia,C, AU - Decarli,A, AU - Negri,E, AU - Parazzini,F, AU - Gentile,A, AU - Cecchetti,G, AU - Fasoli,M, AU - Franceschi,S, PY - 1987/10/1/pubmed PY - 1987/10/1/medline PY - 1987/10/1/entrez SP - 663 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 79 IS - 4 N2 - Dietary factors in the etiology of ovarian cancer were investigated with the use of data from a case-control study conducted in Northern Italy on 455 histologically confirmed epithelial carcinomas and 1,385 control subjects in the hospital for acute conditions unrelated to any of the known or potential risk factors for cancer of the ovary. Women with ovarian cancer reported significantly elevated frequency of consumption of meat [relative risk (RR) = 1.6 for greater than or equal to 7 vs. less than 4 portions/wk], ham (RR = 1.9 for greater than or equal to 4 vs. less than 2 portions/wk), and higher subjective scores of fat intake (RR = 2.1 for highest vs. lowest scores), particularly butter. In contrast, consumptions of fish, green vegetables, carrots, and wholemeal bread or pasta were less frequent in cases; the corresponding risk estimates for highest versus lowest frequencies ranged between 0.6 and 0.8. These results were not materially modified by adjustment for indicators of socioeconomic status, parity, and other identified determinants of ovarian cancer. No relation emerged between alcohol consumption and ovarian cancer risk. The present study provides interesting indications that help to explain the considerable variations in ovarian cancer rates in different populations and, if confirmed, could, in principle, have important public health implications. Due caution, however, is required in interpreting the present results because of the limitations of available information and of the uncertainties of other published material concerning diet and ovarian cancer. SN - 0027-8874 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3116309/full_citation L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/5509 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -