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Multiple sclerosis: the lipid relationship.
Am J Clin Nutr 1988; 48(6):1387-93AJ

Abstract

Between 1949 and 1984, 150 multiple sclerosis patients consumed low-fat diets. Fats, oils, and protein intakes; disability; and deaths were determined. On daily fat consumption of less than 20.1 g (average 17 g), 31% died and deterioration was slight. Daily intakes of greater than 20 g (average of either 25 or 41 g) were attended by serious disability and deaths of 79% and 81%, respectively. Oil intakes bore an indirect relationship to fat consumption. Treatment early and before severe disability developed improved prognosis, and females tended to do better than males. High sensitivity to fats suggests they are involved in the genesis of multiple sclerosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland 97201.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3202088

Citation

Swank, R L., and A Grimsgaard. "Multiple Sclerosis: the Lipid Relationship." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 48, no. 6, 1988, pp. 1387-93.
Swank RL, Grimsgaard A. Multiple sclerosis: the lipid relationship. Am J Clin Nutr. 1988;48(6):1387-93.
Swank, R. L., & Grimsgaard, A. (1988). Multiple sclerosis: the lipid relationship. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 48(6), pp. 1387-93.
Swank RL, Grimsgaard A. Multiple Sclerosis: the Lipid Relationship. Am J Clin Nutr. 1988;48(6):1387-93. PubMed PMID: 3202088.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Multiple sclerosis: the lipid relationship. AU - Swank,R L, AU - Grimsgaard,A, PY - 1988/12/1/pubmed PY - 1988/12/1/medline PY - 1988/12/1/entrez SP - 1387 EP - 93 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 48 IS - 6 N2 - Between 1949 and 1984, 150 multiple sclerosis patients consumed low-fat diets. Fats, oils, and protein intakes; disability; and deaths were determined. On daily fat consumption of less than 20.1 g (average 17 g), 31% died and deterioration was slight. Daily intakes of greater than 20 g (average of either 25 or 41 g) were attended by serious disability and deaths of 79% and 81%, respectively. Oil intakes bore an indirect relationship to fat consumption. Treatment early and before severe disability developed improved prognosis, and females tended to do better than males. High sensitivity to fats suggests they are involved in the genesis of multiple sclerosis. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3202088/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/48.6.1387 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -