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High coffee consumption, brain volume and risk of dementia and stroke.
Nutr Neurosci. 2021 Jun 24 [Online ahead of print]NN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Coffee is a highly popular beverage worldwide, containing caffeine which is a central nervous system stimulant.

OBJECTIVES

We examined whether habitual coffee consumption is associated with differences in brain volumes or the odds of dementia or stroke.

METHODS

We conducted prospective analyses of habitual coffee consumption on 398,646 UK Biobank participants (age 37-73 years), including 17,702 participants with MRI information. We examined the associations with brain volume using covariate adjusted linear regression, and with odds of dementia (4,333 incident cases) and stroke (6,181 incident cases) using logistic regression.

RESULTS

There were inverse linear associations between habitual coffee consumption and total brain (fully adjusted β per cup -1.42, 95% CI -1.89, -0.94), grey matter (β -0.91, 95% CI -1.20, -0.62), white matter (β -0.51, 95% CI -0.83, -0.19) and hippocampal volumes (β -0.01, 95% CI -0.02, -0.003), but no evidence to support an association with white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume (β -0.01, 95% CI -0.07, 0.05). The association between coffee consumption and dementia was non-linear (Pnon-linearity = 0.0001), with evidence for higher odds for non-coffee and decaffeinated coffee drinkers and those drinking >6 cups/day, compared to light coffee drinkers. After full covariate adjustment, consumption of >6 cups/day was associated with 53% higher odds of dementia compared to consumption of 1-2 cups/day (fully adjusted OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.28, 1.83), with less evidence for an association with stroke (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.00, 1.37, p = 0.055).

CONCLUSION

High coffee consumption was associated with smaller total brain volumes and increased odds of dementia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Australian Centre for Precision Health, University of South Australia, Clinical & Health Sciences, Adelaide, Australia.Australian Centre for Precision Health, University of South Australia, Clinical & Health Sciences, Adelaide, Australia. South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, Australia. Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, College of Health Science, Addis Ababa University, Addis, Ababa, Ethiopia.Australian Centre for Precision Health, University of South Australia, Clinical & Health Sciences, Adelaide, Australia. South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, Australia.Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.College of Medicine and Health, University of Exeter, Devon, UK. Alan Turing Institute, London, England.Australian Centre for Precision Health, University of South Australia, Clinical & Health Sciences, Adelaide, Australia. South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34165394

Citation

Pham, Kitty, et al. "High Coffee Consumption, Brain Volume and Risk of Dementia and Stroke." Nutritional Neuroscience, 2021, pp. 1-12.
Pham K, Mulugeta A, Zhou A, et al. High coffee consumption, brain volume and risk of dementia and stroke. Nutr Neurosci. 2021.
Pham, K., Mulugeta, A., Zhou, A., O'Brien, J. T., Llewellyn, D. J., & Hyppönen, E. (2021). High coffee consumption, brain volume and risk of dementia and stroke. Nutritional Neuroscience, 1-12. https://doi.org/10.1080/1028415X.2021.1945858
Pham K, et al. High Coffee Consumption, Brain Volume and Risk of Dementia and Stroke. Nutr Neurosci. 2021 Jun 24;1-12. PubMed PMID: 34165394.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High coffee consumption, brain volume and risk of dementia and stroke. AU - Pham,Kitty, AU - Mulugeta,Anwar, AU - Zhou,Ang, AU - O'Brien,John T, AU - Llewellyn,David J, AU - Hyppönen,Elina, Y1 - 2021/06/24/ PY - 2021/6/24/entrez PY - 2021/6/25/pubmed PY - 2021/6/25/medline KW - Coffee KW - UK Biobank KW - brain volume KW - dementia KW - prospective cohort KW - stroke KW - volumetric MRI SP - 1 EP - 12 JF - Nutritional neuroscience JO - Nutr Neurosci N2 - BACKGROUND: Coffee is a highly popular beverage worldwide, containing caffeine which is a central nervous system stimulant. OBJECTIVES: We examined whether habitual coffee consumption is associated with differences in brain volumes or the odds of dementia or stroke. METHODS: We conducted prospective analyses of habitual coffee consumption on 398,646 UK Biobank participants (age 37-73 years), including 17,702 participants with MRI information. We examined the associations with brain volume using covariate adjusted linear regression, and with odds of dementia (4,333 incident cases) and stroke (6,181 incident cases) using logistic regression. RESULTS: There were inverse linear associations between habitual coffee consumption and total brain (fully adjusted β per cup -1.42, 95% CI -1.89, -0.94), grey matter (β -0.91, 95% CI -1.20, -0.62), white matter (β -0.51, 95% CI -0.83, -0.19) and hippocampal volumes (β -0.01, 95% CI -0.02, -0.003), but no evidence to support an association with white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume (β -0.01, 95% CI -0.07, 0.05). The association between coffee consumption and dementia was non-linear (Pnon-linearity = 0.0001), with evidence for higher odds for non-coffee and decaffeinated coffee drinkers and those drinking >6 cups/day, compared to light coffee drinkers. After full covariate adjustment, consumption of >6 cups/day was associated with 53% higher odds of dementia compared to consumption of 1-2 cups/day (fully adjusted OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.28, 1.83), with less evidence for an association with stroke (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.00, 1.37, p = 0.055). CONCLUSION: High coffee consumption was associated with smaller total brain volumes and increased odds of dementia. SN - 1476-8305 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34165394/full_citation L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1028415X.2021.1945858 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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