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Contrasting disease patterns in psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.

Abstract

In this report we investigate the simultaneous occurrence of psoriasis and atopic dermatitis (AD) as well as the association with infectious skin diseases. Among 29,159 patients hospitalized between 1953 and 1983, 8.5% (2,467 patients) were treated for psoriasis, while 1.6% (470 patients) were hospitalized for AD treatment. On the basis of incidence rates for both diseases, 36 patients (0.14%) with both psoriasis and AD were expected to be seen. However, the two conditions were simultaneously present in 2 patients only. Approximately 30% of the AD patients were suffering from either bacterial or viral infection, while this complication occurred in 6.7% of psoriatics. In addition, among 48 patients hospitalized for eczema herpeticatum 39 were atopics and none was psoriatic. The data demonstrate that the occurrence of psoriasis and AD in one and the same patient is quite rare and this may be related to conflicting immune defense patterns. Thus, increased sensitization against foreign protein together with high susceptibility to cutaneous infection present in AD is in contrast to high phagocyte responsiveness in psoriasis, where concurrent infections are rare.

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Authors+Show Affiliations

,

Department of Dermatology, University of Kiel, Federal Republic of Germany.

Source

Archives of dermatological research 279 Suppl: 1987 pg S48-51

MeSH

Acute Disease
Adult
Bacterial Infections
Dermatitis, Atopic
Female
Humans
Immunity, Cellular
Male
Mycoses
Psoriasis
Retrospective Studies
Virus Diseases

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3662604

Citation

Christophers, E, and T Henseler. "Contrasting Disease Patterns in Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis." Archives of Dermatological Research, vol. 279 Suppl, 1987, pp. S48-51.
Christophers E, Henseler T. Contrasting disease patterns in psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Arch Dermatol Res. 1987;279 Suppl:S48-51.
Christophers, E., & Henseler, T. (1987). Contrasting disease patterns in psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Archives of Dermatological Research, 279 Suppl, pp. S48-51.
Christophers E, Henseler T. Contrasting Disease Patterns in Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis. Arch Dermatol Res. 1987;279 Suppl:S48-51. PubMed PMID: 3662604.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Contrasting disease patterns in psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. AU - Christophers,E, AU - Henseler,T, PY - 1987/1/1/pubmed PY - 1987/1/1/medline PY - 1987/1/1/entrez SP - S48 EP - 51 JF - Archives of dermatological research JO - Arch. Dermatol. Res. VL - 279 Suppl N2 - In this report we investigate the simultaneous occurrence of psoriasis and atopic dermatitis (AD) as well as the association with infectious skin diseases. Among 29,159 patients hospitalized between 1953 and 1983, 8.5% (2,467 patients) were treated for psoriasis, while 1.6% (470 patients) were hospitalized for AD treatment. On the basis of incidence rates for both diseases, 36 patients (0.14%) with both psoriasis and AD were expected to be seen. However, the two conditions were simultaneously present in 2 patients only. Approximately 30% of the AD patients were suffering from either bacterial or viral infection, while this complication occurred in 6.7% of psoriatics. In addition, among 48 patients hospitalized for eczema herpeticatum 39 were atopics and none was psoriatic. The data demonstrate that the occurrence of psoriasis and AD in one and the same patient is quite rare and this may be related to conflicting immune defense patterns. Thus, increased sensitization against foreign protein together with high susceptibility to cutaneous infection present in AD is in contrast to high phagocyte responsiveness in psoriasis, where concurrent infections are rare. SN - 0340-3696 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3662604/full_citation L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/6059 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -