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Prevalence of urinary stone disease in vegetarians.
Eur Urol 1982; 8(6):334-9EU

Abstract

A study was carried out to determine the effect of a low animal protein diet, such as taken by vegetarians, on the risk of urinary stone disease. A nation-wide survey of vegetarians in the UK showed that the prevalence of urinary stone formation is 40-60% of that predicted for a group of individuals taken from the general population and matched for age, sex and social class with the vegetarians. The findings support the hypothesis that a diet low in animal protein reduces the risk of urinary stone formation.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7140784

Citation

Robertson, W G., et al. "Prevalence of Urinary Stone Disease in Vegetarians." European Urology, vol. 8, no. 6, 1982, pp. 334-9.
Robertson WG, Peacock M, Marshall DH. Prevalence of urinary stone disease in vegetarians. Eur Urol. 1982;8(6):334-9.
Robertson, W. G., Peacock, M., & Marshall, D. H. (1982). Prevalence of urinary stone disease in vegetarians. European Urology, 8(6), pp. 334-9.
Robertson WG, Peacock M, Marshall DH. Prevalence of Urinary Stone Disease in Vegetarians. Eur Urol. 1982;8(6):334-9. PubMed PMID: 7140784.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of urinary stone disease in vegetarians. AU - Robertson,W G, AU - Peacock,M, AU - Marshall,D H, PY - 1982/1/1/pubmed PY - 1982/1/1/medline PY - 1982/1/1/entrez SP - 334 EP - 9 JF - European urology JO - Eur. Urol. VL - 8 IS - 6 N2 - A study was carried out to determine the effect of a low animal protein diet, such as taken by vegetarians, on the risk of urinary stone disease. A nation-wide survey of vegetarians in the UK showed that the prevalence of urinary stone formation is 40-60% of that predicted for a group of individuals taken from the general population and matched for age, sex and social class with the vegetarians. The findings support the hypothesis that a diet low in animal protein reduces the risk of urinary stone formation. SN - 0302-2838 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7140784/full_citation L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/vegetariandiet.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -