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A prospective study of diet and the risk of symptomatic diverticular disease in men.
Am J Clin Nutr 1994; 60(5):757-64AJ

Abstract

To examine the association between dietary fiber, sources of fiber, other nutrients, and the diagnosis of symptomatic diverticular disease, we analyzed data from a prospective cohort of 47,888 US men. During 4 y of follow-up we documented 385 new cases of symptomatic diverticular disease. Total dietary fiber intake was inversely associated with the risk of diverticular disease after adjustment for age, energy-adjusted total fat intake, and physical activity [relative risk (RR) 0.58; 95% CI 0.41, 0.83; P for trend = 0.01 for men in the highest as compared with the lowest quintile of dietary fiber]. This inverse association was primarily due to fruit and vegetable fiber. For men on a high-total-fat, low-fiber diet, the RR was 2.35 (95% CI 1.38, 3.98) compared with those on a low-total-fat, high-fiber diet, and for men on a high-red-meat, low-fiber diet the RR was 3.32 (95% CI 1.46, 7.53) compared with those on a low-red-meat, high-fiber diet. These prospective data support the hypothesis that a diet low in total dietary fiber increases the incidence of symptomatic diverticular disease. They also provide evidence that the combination of high intake of total fat or red meat and a diet low in total dietary fiber particularly augments the risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7942584

Citation

Aldoori, W H., et al. "A Prospective Study of Diet and the Risk of Symptomatic Diverticular Disease in Men." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 60, no. 5, 1994, pp. 757-64.
Aldoori WH, Giovannucci EL, Rimm EB, et al. A prospective study of diet and the risk of symptomatic diverticular disease in men. Am J Clin Nutr. 1994;60(5):757-64.
Aldoori, W. H., Giovannucci, E. L., Rimm, E. B., Wing, A. L., Trichopoulos, D. V., & Willett, W. C. (1994). A prospective study of diet and the risk of symptomatic diverticular disease in men. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 60(5), pp. 757-64.
Aldoori WH, et al. A Prospective Study of Diet and the Risk of Symptomatic Diverticular Disease in Men. Am J Clin Nutr. 1994;60(5):757-64. PubMed PMID: 7942584.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective study of diet and the risk of symptomatic diverticular disease in men. AU - Aldoori,W H, AU - Giovannucci,E L, AU - Rimm,E B, AU - Wing,A L, AU - Trichopoulos,D V, AU - Willett,W C, PY - 1994/11/1/pubmed PY - 1994/11/1/medline PY - 1994/11/1/entrez SP - 757 EP - 64 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 60 IS - 5 N2 - To examine the association between dietary fiber, sources of fiber, other nutrients, and the diagnosis of symptomatic diverticular disease, we analyzed data from a prospective cohort of 47,888 US men. During 4 y of follow-up we documented 385 new cases of symptomatic diverticular disease. Total dietary fiber intake was inversely associated with the risk of diverticular disease after adjustment for age, energy-adjusted total fat intake, and physical activity [relative risk (RR) 0.58; 95% CI 0.41, 0.83; P for trend = 0.01 for men in the highest as compared with the lowest quintile of dietary fiber]. This inverse association was primarily due to fruit and vegetable fiber. For men on a high-total-fat, low-fiber diet, the RR was 2.35 (95% CI 1.38, 3.98) compared with those on a low-total-fat, high-fiber diet, and for men on a high-red-meat, low-fiber diet the RR was 3.32 (95% CI 1.46, 7.53) compared with those on a low-red-meat, high-fiber diet. These prospective data support the hypothesis that a diet low in total dietary fiber increases the incidence of symptomatic diverticular disease. They also provide evidence that the combination of high intake of total fat or red meat and a diet low in total dietary fiber particularly augments the risk. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7942584/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/60.5.757 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -