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Serum antioxidants and risk of rheumatoid arthritis.
Ann Rheum Dis 1994; 53(1):51-3AR

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Oxygen free radicals have been implicated as mediators of tissue damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Thus it is possible that several micronutrients acting as antioxidants and free radical scavengers provide protection against RA. Serum alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, and selenium were studied for their associations with the risk of RA.

METHODS

A case control study was nested within a Finnish cohort of 1419 adult men and women. During a median follow up of 20 years, 14 individuals initially free of arthritis developed RA. Two controls per each incident case were individually matched for sex, age, and municipality. Serum alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene and selenium concentrations were measured from stored serum samples. An antioxidant index was calculated as the product of the molar concentrations of these three micronutrients.

RESULTS

Elevated risks of RA were observed at low levels of alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene and selenium, but none of the associations were statistically significant. A significant association, however, was observed with a low antioxidant index (p for trend = 0.03), the relative risk of RA between the lowest tertile and the higher tertiles of its distribution being 8.3 (95% confidence interval 1.0-71.0).

CONCLUSIONS

The results of the present study are in line with the hypothesis that a low antioxidant level is a risk factor for RA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8311556

Citation

Heliövaara, M, et al. "Serum Antioxidants and Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis." Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, vol. 53, no. 1, 1994, pp. 51-3.
Heliövaara M, Knekt P, Aho K, et al. Serum antioxidants and risk of rheumatoid arthritis. Ann Rheum Dis. 1994;53(1):51-3.
Heliövaara, M., Knekt, P., Aho, K., Aaran, R. K., Alfthan, G., & Aromaa, A. (1994). Serum antioxidants and risk of rheumatoid arthritis. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 53(1), pp. 51-3.
Heliövaara M, et al. Serum Antioxidants and Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis. Ann Rheum Dis. 1994;53(1):51-3. PubMed PMID: 8311556.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum antioxidants and risk of rheumatoid arthritis. AU - Heliövaara,M, AU - Knekt,P, AU - Aho,K, AU - Aaran,R K, AU - Alfthan,G, AU - Aromaa,A, PY - 1994/1/1/pubmed PY - 1994/1/1/medline PY - 1994/1/1/entrez SP - 51 EP - 3 JF - Annals of the rheumatic diseases JO - Ann. Rheum. Dis. VL - 53 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Oxygen free radicals have been implicated as mediators of tissue damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Thus it is possible that several micronutrients acting as antioxidants and free radical scavengers provide protection against RA. Serum alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, and selenium were studied for their associations with the risk of RA. METHODS: A case control study was nested within a Finnish cohort of 1419 adult men and women. During a median follow up of 20 years, 14 individuals initially free of arthritis developed RA. Two controls per each incident case were individually matched for sex, age, and municipality. Serum alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene and selenium concentrations were measured from stored serum samples. An antioxidant index was calculated as the product of the molar concentrations of these three micronutrients. RESULTS: Elevated risks of RA were observed at low levels of alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene and selenium, but none of the associations were statistically significant. A significant association, however, was observed with a low antioxidant index (p for trend = 0.03), the relative risk of RA between the lowest tertile and the higher tertiles of its distribution being 8.3 (95% confidence interval 1.0-71.0). CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study are in line with the hypothesis that a low antioxidant level is a risk factor for RA. SN - 0003-4967 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8311556/full_citation L2 - http://ard.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=8311556 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -