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Effects of dietary fat and fiber on plasma and urine androgens and estrogens in men: a controlled feeding study.
Am J Clin Nutr 1996; 64(6):850-5AJ

Abstract

We conducted a controlled feeding study to evaluate the effects of fat and fiber consumption on plasma and urine sex hormones in men. The study had a crossover design and included 43 healthy men aged 19-56 y. Men were initially randomly assigned to either a low-fat, high-fiber or high-fat, low-fiber diet for 10 wk and after a 2-wk washout period crossed over to the other diet. The energy content of diets was varied to maintain constant body weight but averaged approximately 13.3 MJ (3170 kcal)/d on both diets. The low-fat diet provided 18.8% of energy from fat with a ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fat (P:S) of 1.3, whereas the high-fat diet provided 41.0% of energy from fat with a P:S of 0.6. Total dietary fiber consumption from the low- and high-fat diets averaged 4.6 and 2.0 g.MJ-1.d-1, respectively. Mean plasma concentrations of total and sex-hormone-binding-globulin (SHBG)-bound testosterone were 13% and 15% higher, respectively, on the high-fat, low-fiber diet and the difference from the low-fat, high-fiber diet was significant for the SHBG-bound fraction (P = 0.04). Men's daily urinary excretion of testosterone also was 13% higher with the high-fat, low-fiber diet than with the low-fat, high-fiber diet (P = 0.01). Conversely, their urinary excretion of estradiol and estrone and their 2-hydroxy metabolites were 12-28% lower with the high-fat, low-fiber diet (P < or = 0.01). Results of this study suggest that diet may alter endogenous sex hormone metabolism in men.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892-7326, USA. dorganj@dcpcepn.nci.nih.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8942407

Citation

Dorgan, J F., et al. "Effects of Dietary Fat and Fiber On Plasma and Urine Androgens and Estrogens in Men: a Controlled Feeding Study." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 64, no. 6, 1996, pp. 850-5.
Dorgan JF, Judd JT, Longcope C, et al. Effects of dietary fat and fiber on plasma and urine androgens and estrogens in men: a controlled feeding study. Am J Clin Nutr. 1996;64(6):850-5.
Dorgan, J. F., Judd, J. T., Longcope, C., Brown, C., Schatzkin, A., Clevidence, B. A., ... Taylor, P. R. (1996). Effects of dietary fat and fiber on plasma and urine androgens and estrogens in men: a controlled feeding study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 64(6), pp. 850-5.
Dorgan JF, et al. Effects of Dietary Fat and Fiber On Plasma and Urine Androgens and Estrogens in Men: a Controlled Feeding Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 1996;64(6):850-5. PubMed PMID: 8942407.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of dietary fat and fiber on plasma and urine androgens and estrogens in men: a controlled feeding study. AU - Dorgan,J F, AU - Judd,J T, AU - Longcope,C, AU - Brown,C, AU - Schatzkin,A, AU - Clevidence,B A, AU - Campbell,W S, AU - Nair,P P, AU - Franz,C, AU - Kahle,L, AU - Taylor,P R, PY - 1996/12/1/pubmed PY - 1996/12/1/medline PY - 1996/12/1/entrez SP - 850 EP - 5 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 64 IS - 6 N2 - We conducted a controlled feeding study to evaluate the effects of fat and fiber consumption on plasma and urine sex hormones in men. The study had a crossover design and included 43 healthy men aged 19-56 y. Men were initially randomly assigned to either a low-fat, high-fiber or high-fat, low-fiber diet for 10 wk and after a 2-wk washout period crossed over to the other diet. The energy content of diets was varied to maintain constant body weight but averaged approximately 13.3 MJ (3170 kcal)/d on both diets. The low-fat diet provided 18.8% of energy from fat with a ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fat (P:S) of 1.3, whereas the high-fat diet provided 41.0% of energy from fat with a P:S of 0.6. Total dietary fiber consumption from the low- and high-fat diets averaged 4.6 and 2.0 g.MJ-1.d-1, respectively. Mean plasma concentrations of total and sex-hormone-binding-globulin (SHBG)-bound testosterone were 13% and 15% higher, respectively, on the high-fat, low-fiber diet and the difference from the low-fat, high-fiber diet was significant for the SHBG-bound fraction (P = 0.04). Men's daily urinary excretion of testosterone also was 13% higher with the high-fat, low-fiber diet than with the low-fat, high-fiber diet (P = 0.01). Conversely, their urinary excretion of estradiol and estrone and their 2-hydroxy metabolites were 12-28% lower with the high-fat, low-fiber diet (P < or = 0.01). Results of this study suggest that diet may alter endogenous sex hormone metabolism in men. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8942407/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/64.6.850 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -