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Effects of dietary fat and fiber on plasma and urine androgens and estrogens in men: a controlled feeding study.

Abstract

We conducted a controlled feeding study to evaluate the effects of fat and fiber consumption on plasma and urine sex hormones in men. The study had a crossover design and included 43 healthy men aged 19-56 y. Men were initially randomly assigned to either a low-fat, high-fiber or high-fat, low-fiber diet for 10 wk and after a 2-wk washout period crossed over to the other diet. The energy content of diets was varied to maintain constant body weight but averaged approximately 13.3 MJ (3170 kcal)/d on both diets. The low-fat diet provided 18.8% of energy from fat with a ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fat (P:S) of 1.3, whereas the high-fat diet provided 41.0% of energy from fat with a P:S of 0.6. Total dietary fiber consumption from the low- and high-fat diets averaged 4.6 and 2.0 g.MJ-1.d-1, respectively. Mean plasma concentrations of total and sex-hormone-binding-globulin (SHBG)-bound testosterone were 13% and 15% higher, respectively, on the high-fat, low-fiber diet and the difference from the low-fat, high-fiber diet was significant for the SHBG-bound fraction (P = 0.04). Men's daily urinary excretion of testosterone also was 13% higher with the high-fat, low-fiber diet than with the low-fat, high-fiber diet (P = 0.01). Conversely, their urinary excretion of estradiol and estrone and their 2-hydroxy metabolites were 12-28% lower with the high-fat, low-fiber diet (P < or = 0.01). Results of this study suggest that diet may alter endogenous sex hormone metabolism in men.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892-7326, USA. dorganj@dcpcepn.nci.nih.gov

    , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Androgens
    Body Weight
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Dietary Fats
    Dietary Fiber
    Estradiol
    Estrogens
    Estrone
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin
    Testosterone

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    8942407

    Citation

    Dorgan, J F., et al. "Effects of Dietary Fat and Fiber On Plasma and Urine Androgens and Estrogens in Men: a Controlled Feeding Study." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 64, no. 6, 1996, pp. 850-5.
    Dorgan JF, Judd JT, Longcope C, et al. Effects of dietary fat and fiber on plasma and urine androgens and estrogens in men: a controlled feeding study. Am J Clin Nutr. 1996;64(6):850-5.
    Dorgan, J. F., Judd, J. T., Longcope, C., Brown, C., Schatzkin, A., Clevidence, B. A., ... Taylor, P. R. (1996). Effects of dietary fat and fiber on plasma and urine androgens and estrogens in men: a controlled feeding study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 64(6), pp. 850-5.
    Dorgan JF, et al. Effects of Dietary Fat and Fiber On Plasma and Urine Androgens and Estrogens in Men: a Controlled Feeding Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 1996;64(6):850-5. PubMed PMID: 8942407.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of dietary fat and fiber on plasma and urine androgens and estrogens in men: a controlled feeding study. AU - Dorgan,J F, AU - Judd,J T, AU - Longcope,C, AU - Brown,C, AU - Schatzkin,A, AU - Clevidence,B A, AU - Campbell,W S, AU - Nair,P P, AU - Franz,C, AU - Kahle,L, AU - Taylor,P R, PY - 1996/12/1/pubmed PY - 1996/12/1/medline PY - 1996/12/1/entrez SP - 850 EP - 5 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 64 IS - 6 N2 - We conducted a controlled feeding study to evaluate the effects of fat and fiber consumption on plasma and urine sex hormones in men. The study had a crossover design and included 43 healthy men aged 19-56 y. Men were initially randomly assigned to either a low-fat, high-fiber or high-fat, low-fiber diet for 10 wk and after a 2-wk washout period crossed over to the other diet. The energy content of diets was varied to maintain constant body weight but averaged approximately 13.3 MJ (3170 kcal)/d on both diets. The low-fat diet provided 18.8% of energy from fat with a ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fat (P:S) of 1.3, whereas the high-fat diet provided 41.0% of energy from fat with a P:S of 0.6. Total dietary fiber consumption from the low- and high-fat diets averaged 4.6 and 2.0 g.MJ-1.d-1, respectively. Mean plasma concentrations of total and sex-hormone-binding-globulin (SHBG)-bound testosterone were 13% and 15% higher, respectively, on the high-fat, low-fiber diet and the difference from the low-fat, high-fiber diet was significant for the SHBG-bound fraction (P = 0.04). Men's daily urinary excretion of testosterone also was 13% higher with the high-fat, low-fiber diet than with the low-fat, high-fiber diet (P = 0.01). Conversely, their urinary excretion of estradiol and estrone and their 2-hydroxy metabolites were 12-28% lower with the high-fat, low-fiber diet (P < or = 0.01). Results of this study suggest that diet may alter endogenous sex hormone metabolism in men. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8942407/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/64.6.850 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -