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Association of higher saturated fat intake with higher risk of hypertension in an urban population of Trivandrum in south India.

Abstract

Saturated fat intake appears to be a risk factor of insulin resistance which is important in the pathogenesis of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This study aims to demonstrate whether saturated fat intake may be a risk factor of hypertension. Cross-sectional survey in six randomly selected streets in Trivandrum city in south India was conducted to study 1497 randomly selected subjects (737 males and 760 females) of 25-64 years of age. The prevalence of hypertension by Joint National Committee V criteria (> 140/90 were 34.6% (n = 255) in males and 30.7% (n = 234) in females. The consumption of food groups showed that they were within desirable limits. However, the intake of fruit, vegetable, legume and coconuts was lower and saturated fat intake higher (> 10% kcal/day), although total fat intake was within desirable limits. Total and saturated fat intake, and the consumption of coconut oil and butter, flesh foods, milk and yogurt as well as sugar and jaggery were significantly associated with hypertension. Total visible fat (> 20 g/day) intake was positively associated whereas fruit, vegetable, legume and coconut intake (< 400 g/day) was inversely associated with hypertension. Salt intake (> 8 g/day), smoking and illiteracy were not associated with hypertension. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that saturated fat intake, age and body mass index were independently and strongly associated with hypertension whereas fruits, vegetable, legume and coconuts, coconut oil and butter and alcohol (males) intakes were weakly associated with hypertension. The odds ratio indicate higher risk of hypertension due to higher intake of saturated fat in both sexes (mean: odds ratio, 1.07, 95% confidence interval 1.05-1.09; women, 1.08, 1.06-1.12, P < 0.01). Significant determinants of hypertension were higher saturated fat, particularly coconut oil, and lower fruit, vegetable, legume and coconuts, particularly legumes and coconuts in the diet, apart from conventional risk factors.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Home Science, College for Women, Trivandrum, India.

    Source

    International journal of cardiology 58:1 1997 Jan 03 pg 63-70

    MeSH

    Adult
    Confidence Intervals
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Diet Records
    Dietary Fats
    Female
    Humans
    Hypertension
    India
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Odds Ratio
    Prevalence
    Regression Analysis
    Risk Factors
    Urban Population

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    9021429

    Citation

    Beegom, R, and R B. Singh. "Association of Higher Saturated Fat Intake With Higher Risk of Hypertension in an Urban Population of Trivandrum in South India." International Journal of Cardiology, vol. 58, no. 1, 1997, pp. 63-70.
    Beegom R, Singh RB. Association of higher saturated fat intake with higher risk of hypertension in an urban population of Trivandrum in south India. Int J Cardiol. 1997;58(1):63-70.
    Beegom, R., & Singh, R. B. (1997). Association of higher saturated fat intake with higher risk of hypertension in an urban population of Trivandrum in south India. International Journal of Cardiology, 58(1), pp. 63-70.
    Beegom R, Singh RB. Association of Higher Saturated Fat Intake With Higher Risk of Hypertension in an Urban Population of Trivandrum in South India. Int J Cardiol. 1997 Jan 3;58(1):63-70. PubMed PMID: 9021429.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Association of higher saturated fat intake with higher risk of hypertension in an urban population of Trivandrum in south India. AU - Beegom,R, AU - Singh,R B, PY - 1997/1/3/pubmed PY - 1997/1/3/medline PY - 1997/1/3/entrez SP - 63 EP - 70 JF - International journal of cardiology JO - Int. J. Cardiol. VL - 58 IS - 1 N2 - Saturated fat intake appears to be a risk factor of insulin resistance which is important in the pathogenesis of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This study aims to demonstrate whether saturated fat intake may be a risk factor of hypertension. Cross-sectional survey in six randomly selected streets in Trivandrum city in south India was conducted to study 1497 randomly selected subjects (737 males and 760 females) of 25-64 years of age. The prevalence of hypertension by Joint National Committee V criteria (> 140/90 were 34.6% (n = 255) in males and 30.7% (n = 234) in females. The consumption of food groups showed that they were within desirable limits. However, the intake of fruit, vegetable, legume and coconuts was lower and saturated fat intake higher (> 10% kcal/day), although total fat intake was within desirable limits. Total and saturated fat intake, and the consumption of coconut oil and butter, flesh foods, milk and yogurt as well as sugar and jaggery were significantly associated with hypertension. Total visible fat (> 20 g/day) intake was positively associated whereas fruit, vegetable, legume and coconut intake (< 400 g/day) was inversely associated with hypertension. Salt intake (> 8 g/day), smoking and illiteracy were not associated with hypertension. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that saturated fat intake, age and body mass index were independently and strongly associated with hypertension whereas fruits, vegetable, legume and coconuts, coconut oil and butter and alcohol (males) intakes were weakly associated with hypertension. The odds ratio indicate higher risk of hypertension due to higher intake of saturated fat in both sexes (mean: odds ratio, 1.07, 95% confidence interval 1.05-1.09; women, 1.08, 1.06-1.12, P < 0.01). Significant determinants of hypertension were higher saturated fat, particularly coconut oil, and lower fruit, vegetable, legume and coconuts, particularly legumes and coconuts in the diet, apart from conventional risk factors. SN - 0167-5273 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9021429/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-5273(96)02842-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -