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Milk, dietary calcium, and bone fractures in women: a 12-year prospective study.
Am J Public Health 1997; 87(6):992-7AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This study examined whether higher intakes of milk and other calcium-rich foods during adult years can reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures.

METHODS

This was a 12-year prospective study among 77761 women, aged 34 through 59 years in 1980, who had never used calcium supplements. Dietary intake was assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire in 1980, 1984, and 1986. Fractures of the proximal femur (n = 133) and distal radius (n = 1046) from low or moderate trauma were self-reported on biennial questionnaires.

RESULTS

We found no evidence that higher intakes of milk or calcium from food sources reduce fracture incidence. Women who drank two or more glasses of milk per day had relative risks of 1.45 for hip fracture (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.87, 2.43) and 1.05 for forearm fracture (95% CI = 0.88, 1.25) when compared with women consuming one glass or less per week. Likewise, higher intakes of total dietary calcium or calcium from dairy foods were not associated with decreased risk of hip or forearm fracture.

CONCLUSIONS

These data do not support the hypothesis that higher consumption of milk or other food sources of calcium by adult women protects against hip or forearm fractures.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Channing Laboratory, Boston, Mass. 02115, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9224182

Citation

Feskanich, D, et al. "Milk, Dietary Calcium, and Bone Fractures in Women: a 12-year Prospective Study." American Journal of Public Health, vol. 87, no. 6, 1997, pp. 992-7.
Feskanich D, Willett WC, Stampfer MJ, et al. Milk, dietary calcium, and bone fractures in women: a 12-year prospective study. Am J Public Health. 1997;87(6):992-7.
Feskanich, D., Willett, W. C., Stampfer, M. J., & Colditz, G. A. (1997). Milk, dietary calcium, and bone fractures in women: a 12-year prospective study. American Journal of Public Health, 87(6), pp. 992-7.
Feskanich D, et al. Milk, Dietary Calcium, and Bone Fractures in Women: a 12-year Prospective Study. Am J Public Health. 1997;87(6):992-7. PubMed PMID: 9224182.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Milk, dietary calcium, and bone fractures in women: a 12-year prospective study. AU - Feskanich,D, AU - Willett,W C, AU - Stampfer,M J, AU - Colditz,G A, PY - 1997/6/1/pubmed PY - 1997/6/1/medline PY - 1997/6/1/entrez SP - 992 EP - 7 JF - American journal of public health JO - Am J Public Health VL - 87 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This study examined whether higher intakes of milk and other calcium-rich foods during adult years can reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures. METHODS: This was a 12-year prospective study among 77761 women, aged 34 through 59 years in 1980, who had never used calcium supplements. Dietary intake was assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire in 1980, 1984, and 1986. Fractures of the proximal femur (n = 133) and distal radius (n = 1046) from low or moderate trauma were self-reported on biennial questionnaires. RESULTS: We found no evidence that higher intakes of milk or calcium from food sources reduce fracture incidence. Women who drank two or more glasses of milk per day had relative risks of 1.45 for hip fracture (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.87, 2.43) and 1.05 for forearm fracture (95% CI = 0.88, 1.25) when compared with women consuming one glass or less per week. Likewise, higher intakes of total dietary calcium or calcium from dairy foods were not associated with decreased risk of hip or forearm fracture. CONCLUSIONS: These data do not support the hypothesis that higher consumption of milk or other food sources of calcium by adult women protects against hip or forearm fractures. SN - 0090-0036 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9224182/full_citation L2 - http://www.ajph.org/doi/full/10.2105/ajph.87.6.992?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -