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Relation of smoking and alcohol and coffee consumption to active Helicobacter pylori infection: cross sectional study.
BMJ 1997; 315(7121):1489-92BMJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the relation of smoking and alcohol and coffee consumption to active Helicobacter pylori infection.

DESIGN

Cross sectional study of patients attending a general practitioner. Active H pylori infection was measured by the 15C-urea breath test and detailed quantitative information on smoking and on alcohol and coffee consumption was obtained by a standardised self administered questionnaire.

SETTING

One general practice in Germany.

SUBJECTS

447 patients aged 15-79 who had not had peptic ulcer disease or treatment for H pylori infection.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Prevalence of H pylori infection according to smoking and alcohol and coffee consumption.

RESULTS

Overall prevalence of infection was 21% (94/447). There was no significant relation between smoking and active H pylori infection. Alcohol consumption showed a negative dose-response relation and coffee consumption a positive dose-response relation with active infection. After adjustment for potential confounders, the odds ratios for patients who drank < or = 75 g and > 75 g of ethanol a week compared with non-drinkers were 0.90 (95% confidence interval 0.55 to 1.59) and 0.33 (0.16 to 0.68), respectively (P value for trend 0.005, assuming that 1 litre of beer and 0.51 of wine contain on average 50 g of ethanol in south Germany). Adjusted odds ratios for patients who drank < 3 cups and > or = 3 cups of coffee per day compared with those who did not drink coffee were 1.49 (0.71 to 3.12) and 2.49 (1.23 to 5.03), respectively (P value for trend 0.007).

CONCLUSION

These results suggest a protective effect of alcohol consumption against active infection with H pylori and an opposite effect of coffee consumption.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, University of Ulm, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9420488

Citation

Brenner, H, et al. "Relation of Smoking and Alcohol and Coffee Consumption to Active Helicobacter Pylori Infection: Cross Sectional Study." BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), vol. 315, no. 7121, 1997, pp. 1489-92.
Brenner H, Rothenbacher D, Bode G, et al. Relation of smoking and alcohol and coffee consumption to active Helicobacter pylori infection: cross sectional study. BMJ. 1997;315(7121):1489-92.
Brenner, H., Rothenbacher, D., Bode, G., & Adler, G. (1997). Relation of smoking and alcohol and coffee consumption to active Helicobacter pylori infection: cross sectional study. BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), 315(7121), pp. 1489-92.
Brenner H, et al. Relation of Smoking and Alcohol and Coffee Consumption to Active Helicobacter Pylori Infection: Cross Sectional Study. BMJ. 1997 Dec 6;315(7121):1489-92. PubMed PMID: 9420488.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relation of smoking and alcohol and coffee consumption to active Helicobacter pylori infection: cross sectional study. AU - Brenner,H, AU - Rothenbacher,D, AU - Bode,G, AU - Adler,G, PY - 1998/1/8/pubmed PY - 1998/1/8/medline PY - 1998/1/8/entrez SP - 1489 EP - 92 JF - BMJ (Clinical research ed.) JO - BMJ VL - 315 IS - 7121 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the relation of smoking and alcohol and coffee consumption to active Helicobacter pylori infection. DESIGN: Cross sectional study of patients attending a general practitioner. Active H pylori infection was measured by the 15C-urea breath test and detailed quantitative information on smoking and on alcohol and coffee consumption was obtained by a standardised self administered questionnaire. SETTING: One general practice in Germany. SUBJECTS: 447 patients aged 15-79 who had not had peptic ulcer disease or treatment for H pylori infection. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of H pylori infection according to smoking and alcohol and coffee consumption. RESULTS: Overall prevalence of infection was 21% (94/447). There was no significant relation between smoking and active H pylori infection. Alcohol consumption showed a negative dose-response relation and coffee consumption a positive dose-response relation with active infection. After adjustment for potential confounders, the odds ratios for patients who drank < or = 75 g and > 75 g of ethanol a week compared with non-drinkers were 0.90 (95% confidence interval 0.55 to 1.59) and 0.33 (0.16 to 0.68), respectively (P value for trend 0.005, assuming that 1 litre of beer and 0.51 of wine contain on average 50 g of ethanol in south Germany). Adjusted odds ratios for patients who drank < 3 cups and > or = 3 cups of coffee per day compared with those who did not drink coffee were 1.49 (0.71 to 3.12) and 2.49 (1.23 to 5.03), respectively (P value for trend 0.007). CONCLUSION: These results suggest a protective effect of alcohol consumption against active infection with H pylori and an opposite effect of coffee consumption. SN - 0959-8138 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9420488/full_citation L2 - http://www.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=9420488 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -